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Yoga is nothing
but practical psychology
(Sri Aurobindo)

 
 
 

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Texts on Indian Psychology
Listed Author-wise


- There is another page where these texts are sorted by subject.
- There is a separate page for texts by Sri Aurobindo and the Mother.
- If you would like to publish your paper here, please contact us.

(2001) -- Second International Conference on Integral Psychology, Pondicherry, January 2001
(2002) -- National Conference on Yoga and Indian Approaches to Psychology, Pondicherry, September 2002
(2004) -- National Conference on Indian Psychology, Yoga and Consciousness, Pondicherry, December 2004
(2007) -- National Seminar on Indian Psychology: Theory and Models, Bangalore, December 2007


 

  • Only full texts
  • All texts
  1. N.B. Texts by Sri Aurobindo and the Mother are on the Integral Yoga page.
     
  2. Anand, Jyoti (2004). Theory of Karma and Psychological Healing.
  3. This article delineates the role of the theory of Karma in the healing process of women who had undergone a major life crisis.

  4. Anand, Jyoti (2004). Working through emotional pain: A narrative study of healing process.
  5. The paper attempts to understand how people work through their emotional pain to arrive at self-transformation and healing. The study provides rich insights in the role of acknowledging one's vulnerabilities and emotional release in transcending life crises and attaining inner peace.

  6. Auluck, Shanti (2004). Swabhava and swadharma of students and educators, concerns about individualized and value oriented education.
  7. This paper discusses the concepts of ‘swabhava’ and ‘swadharma’ in the context of modern-day education.

  8. Auluck, Shanti (2007). Psychology: the need of a paradigm change.
  9. The article is a general introduction to Indian Psychology. It discusses the various implications it has in the current field of psychology.

  10. Basu, Arabinda (2001). Sri Aurobindo's metaphysical psychology: A brief introduction.
  11. This article briefly explains Sri Aurobindo’s system of yoga and psychology.

  12. Basu, Soumitra (2001). Integral psychotherapy: Personal encounters.
  13. The author presents here his ideas and experiences about integral psychotherapy, a therapy that bases itself on ‘the consciousness paradigm’.

  14. Basu, Srila (2007). Journey of a Teacher.
  15. Batra, Poonam (2004). Education for Social Transformation: Recognising the 'Agency' of the Teacher.
  16. This paper discusses school reforms in India. It points at establishing a case for recognizing the ‘agency’ of the teacher in the process of education and learning and it examines some of the key elements and pedagogical features of an integrated teacher education programme that is likely to enable deep reform while engaging with some of the more fundamental questions related to knowledge and the aim of education.

  17. Bhawuk, Dharm P. S. (2005). A model of self, work, and spirituality from the Bhagavad-Gita: Implications for self-efficacy, goal setting, and global psychology.
  18. This chapter offers an indigenous method to derive a model from the Bhagavad-Gita to show how our physical self is related to social self and work. It highlights how intentional work leads to an entrenched development of social self whereas an indifference towards the fruits of our actions leads us towards our real self. Further, the implications of the model on self-efficacy and goal setting are discussed, together with the possibility of indigenous psychology developing into a global psychology.

  19. Boroditsky, Lera (2009). How does our language shape the way we think?.
  20. Braud, William G. (2007). Integrating yoga epistemology and ontology into an expanded integral approach to research.
  21. An excellent survey of the methods used in Transpersonal Psychology. A slightly revised version of this article has been included in Matthijs Cornelissen, Girishwar Mishra and Suneet Varma (eds.) (2011), Foundations of Indian Psychology (Vol. 1), New-Delhi: Pearson.

  22. Brownstein, Arthur (2004). Mind-Body Interactions in Health and Healing: A Yogic Perspective.
  23. This article talks about the amazing healing system of the human body and how yoga can support this healing system to promote a superior state of mental and physical health.

  24. Choudry, Anuradha (2004). The Legend of the Angirasa Rishis and the Lost Cows.
  25. The article bases itself on the psycho-spiritual interpretation of the Vedas as given by Sri Aurobindo. It examines in particular the famous Vedic legend of the Angirasa Rishis and the lost cows.

  26. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (1998/2005). Self and personality in Sri Aurobindo's yoga: An overview of his terminology.
  27. An overview of the terms Sri Aurobindo uses to explain the different parts and planes of our nature.

  28. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2000). The Integration of Psychological Knowledge from the Spiritual Traditions in the Psychology Curriculum.
  29. A paper published in the journal of the Consciousness and Experiential Psychology section of the British Psychological Society (August 2000).

  30. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Introduction to Consciousness and Its Transformation.
  31. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Consciousness and Its Transformation.
  32. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Introducing Indian Psychology, the Basics.
  33. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Towards an Integral Epistemology of Consciousness: A radical proposal based on Sri Aurobindo's work.
  34. A paper presented at the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore during a conference on Consciousness and Evolution (June 2001).

  35. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2002). Integrality.
  36. An informal talk given at the Cultural Integration Fellowship in San Fransisco, linking the concept of integrality back to the Sanskrit word "purna" (April 2002).

  37. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2002). Sri Aurobindo's Evolutionary Ontology of Consciousness.
  38. In this article a comparison is drawn between Sri Aurobindo's evolutionary conceptualization of consciousness and the concepts of consciousness more commonly encountered in contemporary consciousness studies. A number of ontological and epistemological questions arising out of this comparison are discussed. A slightly modified version was published as a chapter in Helmut Wautischer (ed.). (2008) Ontology of Consciousness: Percipient Action, Boston: The MIT Press.

  39. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2005). Psychology: Five major Indian contributions.
  40. This article discusses the five major contributions which the Indian tradition can make to psychology, and then focusses on six passive and six active aspects of consciousness as conceptualized by Sri Aurobindo.

  41. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2006). Research about yoga and research in yoga: Towards rigorous research in the subjective domain.
  42. This article tries to explain how first-person, yoga-based research can be made rigorous and reliable.

  43. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2007). In Defence of Rigorous Subjectivity.
  44. This article gives the basic argument why rigorous, yoga-based, research of first person experience is necessary to take Psychology further. It is based on a keynote given at the Annual Conference of the Transpersonal Psychology Section of the BPS in 2007.

  45. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). What is knowledge? A reflection based on the work of Sri Aurobindo.
  46. This article looks from an experiential angle at the different types of knowledge that are involved in yoga-based research. A slightly shorter version has been included in Matthijs Cornelissen, Girishwar Mishra and Suneet Varma (eds.) (2011), Foundations of Indian Psychology (Vol. 1), New-Delhi: Pearson.

  47. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). Onward she passed... Rejection as described in Savitri.
  48. The article takes examples from Savitri, a book by Sri Aurobindo, to explain the concept of "rejection", one of the three main skills needed for any true spiritual endeavour. It traces the crucial role played by rejection in the yoga of Ashwapati and Savitri.

  49. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). Sri Aurobindo, A short biography.
  50. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Beyond the mask: An exploration of human identity based on the work of Sri Aurobindo.
  51. After a quick attempt at placing "Indian Psychology" within the context of mainstream academic psychology, the first half of this article discusses the methods that Indian psychology uses to explore our human sense of identity. The second half offers some of its salient findings, regarding both, our surface nature and our innermost Self.

  52. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Are Schools Injurious to Health?.
  53. Educational theories and policies tend to include noble and inspiring ideals regarding the "all-round development" of the students. The practice lives, however, rarely up to the intent. More often than not, the content of the curriculum and the manner in which it is transacted are such, that a negative effect on the healthy development of the students is almost inevitable. This chapter asks attention for some of these factors, and suggests that much could be gained, if we would be more open to what the Indian tradition can contribute to contemporary psychology.

  54. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Types of knowledge and what they allow us to see: How our research methods affect the quality of our psychological understanding.
  55. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2014). A few slides.
  56. This article is an annotated list of PDF files with Keynote slides on issues like: types of knowledge; methodology & epistemology; consciousness; the structure of the personality; etc.

  57. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs, Misra, Girishwar, & Varma, Suneet (Eds.) (2011). Introduction to Foundations of Indian Psychology.
  58. Cortright, Brant (2001). Integral psychotherapy as existential Vedanta.
  59. Dalal, A. S. (2001). Reversal of consciousness, thoughts on the psychology of the new birth.
  60. Dalal, A. S. (2004). Sri Aurobindo on Cosmic Consciousness: An Integral View.
  61. The article mainly focuses on the theme of cosmic consciousness as presented by Sri Aurobindo in his writings.

  62. Dalal, Ajit K. (1999). Health beliefs and coping with a chronic illness.
  63. This paper examines the relationship between cultural beliefs about illness and psychological adjustment to a chronic disease. It argues for an integrated health care system combining the strengths of traditional healing and biomedical practices.

  64. Dalal, Ajit K. (2005). Integrating Traditional Services within Primary Health Care.
  65. This paper critically reviews the current status of primary health care services in India. The paper argues that traditional health services which have existed for thousands of years and have wide acceptance and application throughout India need to be rejuvenated and integrated within the existing health care programmes.

  66. Dalal, Ajit K. (2006). Social interventions to moderate discriminatory attitudes: The case of the physically challenged in India.
  67. Disability attitudes are the major barriers in improving life conditions of physically challenged in developing countries. In this article, some social interventions aimed at changing the disability attitudes of rural people in India are discussed.

  68. Dalal, Ajit K. (2006). Psychosocial Interventions for Community Development.
  69. The chapter argues that it is a major challenge for the Government, bureaucrats, activists and social scientists to prepare viable community development programmes. The psycho-social barriers to community participation have been discussed and ways are suggested to facilitate it.

  70. Dalal, Ajit K. (2010). Folk wisdom and traditional healing practices: Some lessons for modern psychotherapies..
  71. This chapter explores the characteristic features of traditional healing practices and attempts to decipher the ways in which they work. The purpose is to draw parallels between folk practices and modern psychotherapies and identify learning opportunities from ancient wisdom.

  72. Dalal, Ajit K. (2010). A journey back to the roots: Psychology in India.
  73. This chapter traces the history of psychology in India and discusses how it can be enriched by drawing from the classical Indian texts.

  74. Dalal, Ajit K., & Biswas, G. (2009). Self-construal among healthy and chronically sick women.
  75. The nature of self-construal was qualitatively explored among healthy and chronically sick women. The narrative analysis of their life scripts focused on the role of health and life circumstances in shaping their self-construal. It was found that most of these women construed their selves in terms of their role relationships.

  76. Dalal, Ajit K., & Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2010). Sri Aurobindo: A Yogi and a Poet.
  77. The chapter discusses the biography of an eminent Indian yogi and a poet, Sri Aurobindo. It also throws light on his creative genius as evident in his writings, particularly in his classic work, Savitri.

  78. Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2002). Social psychology in India: Evolution and emerging trends.
  79. The chapter deals with growth and expansion of social psychology in India. It illuminates how western social psychology went through the process of indigenization in India.

  80. Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2006). Psychology of health and well-being: Some emerging perspectives.
  81. This paper tries to offer an overview of the salient developments in the area of health psychology by critically examining the concepts and research evidence. The key aspects of Ayurveda and the contemporary health scenario in the Indian context is presented. A comprehensive model of health consisting of three components, i.e., restoration, maintenance and promotion is presented.

  82. Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2010). The core and context of Indian psychology.
  83. This article makes an effort to conceptualize and situate the emerging field of Indian psychology (IP) in the disciplinary matrix. The meaning, scope, critical features and misconceptions about IP have been articulated.

  84. Dalal, Ajit K., & Singh, A. K. (1992). The role of causal and recovery beliefs in the psychological adjustment to a chronic disease.
  85. This paper attempts to study psychological adjustment of hospital patients seeking treatment for tuberculosis using the attributional theoretical approach. They examined patients' perceptions of their disease, its causes and the factors which may be responsible for recovery. The findings highlighted the importance of cultural factors in shaping patients' perception of the causes and recovery. They revealed the extent to which metaphysical concerns shape the construction of illness in India, and also explain why patients seek alternative healing systems.

  86. Dash, A. S. (2004). Methods of Study in Indian Psychology.
  87. This paper discusses the various methods applied by some of the ancient Indian systems to study the human mind.

  88. Elamurugan, V. S. (2004). Yoga, Liberation and Transformation, Health and Healing.
  89. This paper gives a quick review of the meaning and application of yoga. Yoga, defined here as a science of life liberates, transforms and heals.

  90. Gala, Jigisha (2004). Coping With Stress Among Indian Adolescents Belonging to the High Income Group.
  91. This paper is a study on the various ways of coping with stress employed by adolescents. Two major ways found to cope with stress are: problem solving and managing emotions.

  92. Gaur, Sunil D. (2005). Self in contemporary life: Challenges and possibilities.
  93. In contrast to Western psychology which provides an outward-looking view focusing on the problems faced by man and their solutions, Indian psychology views such problems as related to deeper philosophical aspects of the human being and suggests an inward-looking approach to solve them. The quest for self and identity and the nature of self as "witness" provides the platform for psychological enquiry and research at different levels of existence, from biosocial to spiritual.

  94. Goswami, Ayushman (2004). Yoga, Meditation and Education: A way of character building.
  95. This paper deals with the Gita’s perspective on Yoga in relation to improving the quality of education, methods of teaching, and morale of teachers.

  96. Hargiss, Dennis (2001). Integral phenomenology: A method for the 'new psychology', the study of mysticism and the sacred.
  97. Based on comparative studies in mysticism and history of religion the author explains a new approach in methodology for the “new psychology” called “Integral phenomenology”.

  98. Henry, Jane (2001). Developing creativity.
  99. This paper shows how Western ideas about how creativity develops have changed over time, through a consideration of the role of inspiration, luck, ability, style, mental flexibility, motivation, experience, intuition and context.

  100. Huppes, Neeltje (2004). Psychic Education: A workbook based on the writings of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother (bk).
  101. This book was initially meant as a practical guide for teachers and trainees at Mirambika, the Free Progress unit of the Sri Aurobindo Education Society at New Delhi. Over time it has, however, proven invaluable for many others who are not directly involved in education, but who are serious about their spiritual growth, and who want to implement spirituality in their daily life and work.

  102. Huppes, Neeltje (2005). The evolving soul, a key concept in Sri Aurobindo's work: Its ramifications for further development of human potential and Indian Psychology.
  103. This chapter elucidates some of the deepest and highest horizons of mankind based on Sri Aurobindo's vision. Sri Aurobindo foresaw new possibilities for the human instrument and developed techniques for the further development of human potential. The evolving soul or psychic being has an important role in this new development.

  104. Huppes, Neeltje (2008). Workshop teaching psychology: The methodology of an integrated approach.
  105. This article is a practical guide for a workshop that explores a new way to understand and teach psychology. It states the importance for change in the objectives and methods of psychology education.

  106. Huppes, Neeltje (2010). Emerging Concerns and Procedures Related to Education of Values: The Vision of Sri Aurobindo.
  107. This article bases itself on the ideas of Sri Aurobindo. It talks about the developmental model of education based on universal principles such as self-awareness and self-development of the students and the teachers.

  108. Huppes, Neeltje (2011). Integral education: An application of Indian psychology
  109. A short, but comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of Integral Education as practised in Mirambika.

  110. Huppes, Neeltje (2011). Teaching Indian Psychology — Challenges and Prospects: An application-oriented paper.
  111. This paper discusses some of the ways and means related to content and process of teaching Indian Psychology. It also addresses the question regarding how to give consciousness its rightful place when we bring Indian psychology back into the classroom.

  112. Iatsenko, Vladimir (2001). Sanjnana, ajnana, vijnana, prajnana.
  113. Iatsenko, Vladimir (2008). Vedic Studies: Hymns to Indra, RV 5.29 - 5.34.
  114. Here are posted the various hymns that are studied at the weekly class held at IPI by Vladimir.

  115. Kapur, Preeti, & Misra, Girishwar (2003). Image of self in the Sikh community: Continuity of the core and global presence.
  116. This article explores the social, psychological and historical processes through which the Sikh community has categorised and differentiated itself from other communities to form a distinct identity. The self-construal of the Sikh community is constituted by spiritual, heroic and aesthetic images. It has a core of shared religious, social and cultural attributes, and a unique blending of continuity and change has helped the Sikh community to have a global presence.

  117. Kishore, K. (2011). Women's identity in psychological theory and the Indian cultural context.
  118. This paper attempts to examine some of the predominant theories within psychological discourse on women's identity that are centred around either the ground plan of the body or around relational models of connectedness, interdependence and ethics of responsibility. The paper calls for an approach that looks at the construction of gender as a product of particular cultural circumstances and gender relations as endlessly adaptable and inventive. It also suggests that any study of women's identity in the Indian cultural context must deconstruct the singular monolithic notion of womanhood and explore the aspects of women's identity as coloured by differences of caste, class, region, generation, etc.

  119. Krishnan, Lilavathi, Varma, P., & Pandey, V. (2009). Reward and punishment allocation in the Indian culture.
  120. Two scenario studies examined justice perceptions in Indian samples. It was suggested that subjects thought in terms of merit and need, instead of merit or need. Need and merit were rated as being similar in importance when deciding a fair punishment. Attention was drawn to several aspects of justice perception, especially those related to punishment.

  121. Krishnan, Meenakshi (2011). A Participant's view of the IPI introductory course in Indian psychology.
  122. This article is about the Introductory Course on Indian Psychology oraganized by IPI.

  123. Kumar, Sanjay (2011). Significance of workshop on Indian psychology: A participant's review.
  124. This article is about the Introductory Course on Indian Psychology oraganized by IPI.

  125. Madan, Ranjana (2004). Managing Self by Detached Involvement.
  126. This paper bases itself on the teachings of The Mother and Sri Aurobindo and discusses a few tools that they have given to lead a peaceful, harmonious life. A few exercises that help doing this are discussed: stepping back into yourself, self-observation, widening the consciousness etc.

  127. Malik, Pravir (2002). The Flowering of Arvind Eye Care System.
  128. Marwaha, Sonali Bhatt (2005). Living with poverty: Are psycho-spiritual dimensions the x-factor in family resilience? A proposed research agenda.
  129. The chapter explores the sense of well-being, feelings of happiness and depression among the rural and urban poor. In the process, the extent and role of religious beliefs and practices in coping with poverty have been investigated.

  130. Maslow, Jan (2001). Insight dialogue session.
  131. This paper is a theoretical and practical guide to a form of meditation known as “insight dialogue”.

  132. Mathew, V. George (2001). Models of consciousness and its transformation.
  133. This article explores the models of consciousness from the Indian perspective.

  134. Mathew, V. George (2004). An Integrative Model of Personality and Personal Growth.
  135. This paper elucidates the role of the psychologist in the Indian tradition and reaffirms that personal growth is indispensible to lead an integrated and happy life.

  136. Mehra, Beloo (2004). Individualised and Collaborative Learning: Towards Integral Studies Curriculum at AUM.
  137. This paper provides a brief account of the work being done with regard to finding ways and approaches to bring Indian contributions to inner sciences into the learning experiences of the students at Antioch University.

  138. Mendiratta, Ankita (2004). Integral Education: Learning through Self.
  139. This paper discusses the principles of Integral education and presents a case study of Integral education put in practice at a laboratory school in Baroda.

  140. Menon, Sangeetha (2001). Beside the intentor and the integrator: Looking at two faces of consciousness.
  141. This article explores the question whether the duality involved in understanding consciousness is true or not.

  142. Miovic, Michael (2001). Towards a spiritual psychology: Bridging psychodynamic psychotherapy with Integral Yoga.
  143. This paper argues that “the fundamental questions of metaphysics are not trivial, because the answers we select for them determine the framework of metapsychology, and that in turn influences clinical practice”. In other words this paper attempts to show how Eastern and Western psychologies can be integrated using a spiritual metapsychology, and how this would affect the theoretical basis of psychotherapy.

  144. Miovic, Michael (2004). Sri Aurobindo and Transpersonal Psychology.
  145. This article provides an overview of Sri Aurobindo’s psychological thought and system of Integral Yoga Psychology (IYP). Relevant biographical and historical background are introduced, and Sri Aurobindo's influence on the development of transpersonal psychology reviewed. Using Sri Aurobindo’s cosmology of consciousness as a framework for transpersonal experience, IYP’s model of planes of consciousness and parts of the being is explained and illustrated with quotations from Sri Aurobindo’s writings. Emphasis is placed on the psychic being (soul) and overhead planes of consciousness, as these are central to IYP’s psycho-spiritual method of transforming the ego. Finally, implications for transpersonal development and transpersonal therapy are formulated, and some clinical applications given.

  146. Mohan, Aruna G. (2004). Self-Awareness of the Teacher Develops a Holistic Approach to Education (J. Krishnamurti's Perspective).
  147. This paper expounds the perspectives of J. Krishnamurti on education, in particular the importance of observing and learning one’s own inner psychological structure.

  148. Mohan, Deepa (2005). Spirituality: Its impact on health and well-being.
  149. The chapter discusses the effect of spiritual and religious practices on human health and well-being. It reviews studies in the area of mental and physical health to suggest that health behaviour, and quality of social and family life are contingent on religious beliefs, rites and practices.

  150. Mohan, K. Krishna (2001). Spirituality and well-being: An overview.
  151. This paper shows the close relationship between spirituality and well-being by presenting research based evidence that spirituality or a spiritual way of life has a bearing on well-being. In addition, it shows that ideas or concepts drawn from spirituality can be effectively applied to counselling and psychotherapy.

  152. Mohanty, Bindu (2007). Auroville: Towards a Spiritualized Society based on Integral Yoga.
  153. The paper seeks to present preliminary findings from a qualitative research project – an interpretive inquiry — that explores how spiritual ideals held by individuals inform the social psychology of Auroville, a growing international town of 1,800 people from over forty countries.

  154. Mohrhoff, Ulrich (2001). Beyond the cookie cutter paradigm.
  155. This paper brings together the theories of quantum physics with the Indian concept of consciousness.

  156. Mulla, R. Z., & Krishnan, R. V. (2008). Karma-yoga, the Indian work ideal, and its relationship with empathy.
  157. The relationship of Karma-Yoga with the dimensions of empathy was explored. The results highlighted the differential impact of dimensions of empathy and Karma-yoga was found to be similar to altruism motivation in the Indian context.

  158. Narayanan, Annalakshmi (2004). Integral Psychotherapeutic Intervention for Disturbances of Mind, Body and Vital among Adolescents.
  159. Narayanan, S. (2001). The probabilistic orientation.
  160. Pahwa, Manasi (2004). Spirituality and Counseling.
  161. This paper expresses the need for counsellors to not only develop skills of empathy but also of understanding and love. It states that, “love brings profound healing, and understanding brings lessening of fear”.

  162. Pandey, Alok (2001). Practical aspects of integral psychotherapy.
  163. This articles draws the general outline of the principles and techniques of integral psychotherapy.

  164. Pandey, Alok (2004). Psychotherapy and Indian Thought.
  165. This chapter provides a broad overview of the many ways in which Indian psychological concepts and practices can be used in all aspects of counselling and psychiatric care.

  166. Pandey, Alok (2009). Consciousness based approach: An overview.
  167. The article focuses on a consciousness-based approach towards health and healing. According to the author an illness is essentially an inner disequilibrium and that the healer’s task is primarily to help the patient regain the inner and the outer balance.

  168. Pandey, Ashish (2009). Spiritual Climate of Business Organizations.
  169. A well-developed research paper on the importance of spirituality in management: its role and relevance. As the author states, “ the major thesis of this research is that spirituality of employees is reflected in work climate” and this in turn leads to a positive affect of the employees’ service to the customers.

  170. Pandey, N., & Naidu, R. K. (1992). Anasakti and health: A study of non-attachment.
  171. This paper is a study of the indigenous concept of anasakti (non attachment) and its implications for health. The key features of anasakti are identified as effort orientation, emotional equipoise, and weak concern for external reward. The study empirically explored the relationship of anasakti with stress and strain. Results showed that Anasakti had a negative relationship with distress. Progressive detachment was recommended to reduce stress and lead to better performance.

  172. Paranjpe, Anand C. (2005). Building tall on solid foundations: Directions for indigenous personality research in India.
  173. The chapter identifies the most fundamental concepts and insights from the Indian tradition in the field of personality and the self. Yoga and Advaita are further considered as ways of personality development and self-realization with a comment on possible types of research concerning traditional Indian forms of counselling.

  174. Patel, Aster (2001). Working in Matter.
  175. Priya, Kumar Ravi (2004). Survivors' suffering and healing amidst changing socioeconomic forces in two years of post-earthquake Kachchh.
  176. This study provides an account of the socio-historically rooted healing of earthquake survivors over a period of two years in post-earthquake Kachchh. An ethnographic approach was adopted to incorporate the changing socioeconomic context and its impact on the suffering and healing process.

  177. Rai, Pramod Kumar (2004). Unveiling Consciousness: Vedantic theory of personality revisited.
  178. This paper discusses the structure of human personality as found in Vedantic psychology and concentrates in particular on the theory of “panch koshas”.

  179. Rajalakshmi, N. P. (2004). Vanaprastha — An Experiment, A Way of Life.
  180. This paper presents a broad overview on a unique experiment in community living by senior citizens called “Vanaprastha”. It presents a plethora of opportunities for research in the area of old age, living situations for the aged and effects of spiritual practices.

  181. Rao, K. Ramakrishna (2005). Scope and substance of Indian Psychology.
  182. Indian psychology studies consciousness in its multifaceted manifestations and offers a set of practices which can be used in realizing truth and for the transformation of the human condition towards perfection.

  183. Rao, Mrinalini (2004). If You Don't Mind, It Does Not Matter: A Vedantic exploration of Mind as the object of the self.
  184. The paper states that the paradigm shift of the mind as the seen and the self as the seer has significant implications for mind management.

  185. Rao, Mrinalini (2007). The Wave yearns to be Water: Cultural practices in the Indian tradition to invoke wholeness.
  186. The article takes a deeper look into Hinduism and the various psychological implications it has on the modern practitioner.

  187. Raveesh, B. N. (2004). Role of Religion in Health.
  188. This paper presents a study undertaken to learn about the religious beliefs of hospitalized inpatients and to assess the importance of utilizing religious beliefs in treatment.

  189. Reddy, Ananda (2001). Vedantic yoga-psychology.
  190. Basing itself on ancient Indian thought this article explores the scope and meaning of Vedantic yoga-psychology.

  191. Sahay, Pragya (2004). Liberation and Transformation through Yoga.
  192. This paper discusses how one can get liberation from desire and transform the lower nature through yoga.

  193. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2001). Contextual approach to meditation and integral psychology.
  194. This article delves deeper into the spiritual dimension of yoga and meditation and explores the real meaning of these terms from the viewpoint of serious practitioners and researchers.

  195. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2002). Psychology of meditation: Theory and practice.
  196. The article gives an overview of (mainly Western) research on and practical advice for the early stages of meditation in the context of modern life.

  197. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2008). Indian thought and tradition: A psychohistorical perspective.
  198. The chapter examines the different senses of "Indian psychology". It also discusses the basic concepts and constructs and presents a well-rounded historical introduction. The development of Indian psychology is traced from the Vedic times to the present day, looking for some commonality between disparate thought systems.

  199. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2010). Indian indigenous concepts and perspectives: Developments and future possibilities.
  200. Salmon, Don (2001). Voyaging through worlds of splendour and calm: An experience of integral psychology.
  201. This article illustrates the principles of Integral psychology with the help of various exercises and practical examples.

  202. Samson, Urmila (2004). Towards a New Education.
  203. This paper outlines the needs of children during different stages as they grow up, which, if fulfilled, will contribute to holistic development.

  204. Sedlmeier, Peter (2007). Indian Psychology and the Scientific Method.
  205. A clear exposition of how the existing and well-established methods of mainstream psychology can be applied to Indian Psychology. With some minor changes included in Matthijs Cornelissen, Girishwar Mishra and Suneet Varma (eds.) (2011), Foundations of Indian Psychology (Vol. 1), New-Delhi: Pearson.

  206. Sharan, M. B. (2005). Understanding of human mind and behaviour: The missing link of intuitive experience.
  207. This paper calls for Intuition as a method of psychology and suggests how intuitive mind can be developed for having intuitive experience.

  208. Sharma, Chote Narayan (2001). Consciousness and its transformation (CNS).
  209. Sharma, Pulkit (2004). On The Seashore: Dialogues Between Indian Psychology and Modern Psychotherapy.
  210. According to this paper in order to alleviate suffering, Indian Psychology and modern psychotherapy can complement each other; a theoretical framework is needed that could contain all levels of consciousness, which could create a possibility of a dialogue between diverse perspectives.

  211. Sharma, Pulkit (2006). Science and spirituality: From impasse to innovation.
  212. This paper addresses the split created between 'science and spirituality' within dominant academic discourse which is leading to inner chaos in the minds of modern youth. It has further highlighted the need to have a dialogue between scientists and spiritualists to bridge the split.

  213. Shirazi, Bahman A. K. (2001). Integral psychology, metaphors and processes of personal integration.
  214. Shraddhavan (2001). Savitri, a key to Sri Aurobindo's "psycho-cosmology".
  215. Sibia, Anjum (2011). Life and learning at Mirambika: Towards evolving mind.
  216. This article uses the ethnographic method to examine the teaching-learning process in Mirambika, a centre for learning based on Free Progress Education, as outlined by Sri Aurobindo and The Mother.

  217. Singh, Abha (2004). Hatha Yoga, Health and Healing.
  218. Singh, Avadesh (2004). On the Hegemony of Western Research Methodology: Quest for Alternative Indian Perspectives.
  219. The article explores the Indian theories and perspectives on research methodologies.

  220. Singh, Kundan (2001). Beyond postmodernism: Towards a future psychology.
  221. This paper explores the connection between postmodern thought and mysticism with reference to psychology.

  222. Singh, Kundan (2014). Laying the Foundations for Indian psychology.
  223. Srivastava, G. N. Prakash (2004). Indigenous Approaches to Self and Consciousness.
  224. Srivastava, Mukesh (2004). Self and Consciousness.
  225. This paper develops the thesis that consciousness per se is not constructed or shaped by the material process of cognition or perception triggered by the brain, but that in the ultimate sense, the nature of consciousness may appear to be like that of an energy field transcending the boundaries of individual brains and all external objects.

  226. Suneetha, K. (2005). Coping with incarceration: The role of yoga, meditation, and spirituality.
  227. The chapter explores the role of religion in coping with the stresses of incarceration by prison inmates, and in bringing about a sense of well-being and happiness in their dismal existence. The efficacy of yoga, meditation and spiritual counselling have been further explored as life-transforming tools with the potential to bring about attitudinal and behavioural changes that render them less likely to return to the prison later.

  228. Varma, Suneet (2005). From the self to the Self: An exposition on personality based on the works of Sri Aurobindo.
  229. The focus in this chapter is on the conceptualization of the person from Sri Aurobindo's perspective. The author demonstrates clear links with the larger Indian perspective which the author has been able to personally relate to, and differentiates Sri Aurobindo's perspective from some major schools of mainstream psychology, like Psychoanalysis, Behaviourism, Humanistic psychology and Transpersonal psychology (which comes closest to the Indian perspective).

  230. Velmans, Max (2001). A map of consciousness studies.
  231. Vimala, T. D. (2004). The Indian approach to personality development.
  232. This paper examines the ashrama scheme of life and other traditional practices for the integrated development of personality which equips the individual to face contemporary challenges and lead a fulfilled life.

  233. Wadhwa, Toolika (2007). Beyond the Prison Walls: Reforming through Silence.
  234. The article, based on a study done in Tihar Jail, focuses on how experiential meditation in Vipassana helps the inmates to attain peace of mind, deal with their emotions related to crime and reconstruct their identities. It presents the beliefs, experiences and practices of these inmates.

  1. N.B. Texts by Sri Aurobindo and the Mother are on the Integral Yoga page.
     
  2. Agarwal, Adesh (2002). Spritual and Subjective Well-Being in Indian Tradition and Contemporary Psychology.
  3. Agarwal, Adesh (2004). Nishkama Karmayog and Anasakti: Motivation for Self Realization.
  4. Ahi, Sneha (2007). Silence and Healing.
  5. Akhter, Jamal (2002). Indian Psychology and Practical Applications of Yoga.
  6. Anand, Jyoti (2004). Theory of Karma and Psychological Healing.
  7. This article delineates the role of the theory of Karma in the healing process of women who had undergone a major life crisis.

  8. Anand, Jyoti (2004). Working through emotional pain: A narrative study of healing process.
  9. The paper attempts to understand how people work through their emotional pain to arrive at self-transformation and healing. The study provides rich insights in the role of acknowledging one's vulnerabilities and emotional release in transcending life crises and attaining inner peace.

  10. Anand, Jyoti (2007). What is Psychological Healing? Towards Identifying its Salient Attributes.
  11. Anjali (2004). An Analysis Of the Concept of Lalan-Palan as Directing Mother Baby Interactions.
  12. Anjali (2007). Transmission of Values or Transition in Values?.
  13. Arora, Neeta (2007). Critical Consciousness.
  14. Arun, B. K. (2007). The Invisible Synthesis of Eastern and Western Managerial Thoughts Through the Subtle Principles of Yoga - An Empirical Study.
  15. Ashar, Haresh (2007). Study of Metropolitan Psychology and Managing Occupational Stress through Yogic Techniques.
  16. Auluck, Shanti (2004). Swabhava and swadharma of students and educators, concerns about individualized and value oriented education.
  17. This paper discusses the concepts of ‘swabhava’ and ‘swadharma’ in the context of modern-day education.

  18. Auluck, Shanti (2007). Psychology: the need of a paradigm change.
  19. The article is a general introduction to Indian Psychology. It discusses the various implications it has in the current field of psychology.

  20. Babu, Victor K. (2007). Human Relationships In Yoga: Sri Aurobindo's Perspective.
  21. Bajpai, Reena (2007). Concept and Role of Kriya yoga in Patanjala Yoga Sutra.
  22. Bala, Indu (2007). Vipassana: A Practical Approach for Mental Peace.
  23. Balakrishnan, R. (2004). Yoga Attitude and USHA Well-being among Yoga practitioners.
  24. Baniwal, Vikas (2007). Chariots of the Gods: A Study of Vahan in Indian Mythology.
  25. Bashyam, S. (2007). Models for Intellectual Development from Patanjali Yoga Sutram, Bhagvad Gita and Taittiriya Upanishad.
  26. Basu, Arabinda (2001). Sri Aurobindo's metaphysical psychology: A brief introduction.
  27. This article briefly explains Sri Aurobindo’s system of yoga and psychology.

  28. Basu, Soumitra (2001). Integral psychotherapy: Personal encounters.
  29. The author presents here his ideas and experiences about integral psychotherapy, a therapy that bases itself on ‘the consciousness paradigm’.

  30. Basu, Soumitra (2002). Evolution of Cognitive Consciousness.
  31. Basu, Soumitra (2004). The Place of Ego in Sri Aurobindo's Psychological System.
  32. Basu, Soumitra (2007). The Cosmic Consciousness - Sri Aurobindo's Perspective in The Life Divine.
  33. Basu, Srila (2007). Journey of a Teacher.
  34. Basu, Srila (2007). Reflective Practices in elementary education.
  35. Batra, Poonam (2004). Education for Social Transformation: Recognising the 'Agency' of the Teacher.
  36. This paper discusses school reforms in India. It points at establishing a case for recognizing the ‘agency’ of the teacher in the process of education and learning and it examines some of the key elements and pedagogical features of an integrated teacher education programme that is likely to enable deep reform while engaging with some of the more fundamental questions related to knowledge and the aim of education.

  37. Batra, Tripta (2004). Peace Education, Self Development and Teacher Education.
  38. Baveja, Bharati (2004). Teacher Education in India: Towards an Alternative Framework.
  39. Baveja, Bharati (2007). Reflective Practices In Teacher Education.
  40. Bhatt, S. R. (2004). Pure Cognition: Philosophical Analysis from Nyaya Point of View.
  41. Bhatt, S. R. (2007). Pure Cognition: Psychological Fact or Logical Myth.
  42. Bhawuk, Dharm P. S. (2005). A model of self, work, and spirituality from the Bhagavad-Gita: Implications for self-efficacy, goal setting, and global psychology.
  43. This chapter offers an indigenous method to derive a model from the Bhagavad-Gita to show how our physical self is related to social self and work. It highlights how intentional work leads to an entrenched development of social self whereas an indifference towards the fruits of our actions leads us towards our real self. Further, the implications of the model on self-efficacy and goal setting are discussed, together with the possibility of indigenous psychology developing into a global psychology.

  44. Bhawuk, Dharm P. S. (2007). Manas in Yajur Veda, Bhagavad-Gita, and Contemporary Culture: Beyond the Etic-Emic Research Paradigm.
  45. Bhosale, Sushama Jayant (2004). Application of Indian Philosophy, Yoga and Spirituality to Psychology as an academic Science.
  46. Bhushan, Braj (2004). Cognition and Consciousness Research: Integrating Science and Spirituality.
  47. Bijlani, R. L. (2002). The yogic view of life with a special reference to medicine.
  48. This chapter discusses the relevance of yoga as a way of life in dealing with health and happiness.

  49. Bijlani, R. L. (2007). A Spiritual Approach to Cognitive Therapy.
  50. Boroditsky, Lera (2009). How does our language shape the way we think?.
  51. Braud, William G. (2007). Integrating yoga epistemology and ontology into an expanded integral approach to research.
  52. An excellent survey of the methods used in Transpersonal Psychology. A slightly revised version of this article has been included in Matthijs Cornelissen, Girishwar Mishra and Suneet Varma (eds.) (2011), Foundations of Indian Psychology (Vol. 1), New-Delhi: Pearson.

  53. Brownstein, Arthur (2004). Mind-Body Interactions in Health and Healing: A Yogic Perspective.
  54. This article talks about the amazing healing system of the human body and how yoga can support this healing system to promote a superior state of mental and physical health.

  55. Chaudhary, Anshu (2007). Un-bounding the bonding: The search for the meaning of marriage.
  56. Chaudhary, P. N. (2002). Indigenous Indian Psychology: Whether modulative or generative orientation.
  57. Chauhan, Gargi Singh (2004). A Teacher's Words, Motivation for Self-Knowledge and Self-Development.
  58. Chaya, M. S. (2007). Dimensions of Indian diet and their role in modifying the Psychological aspects of the personality.
  59. Choudry, Anuradha (2004). The Legend of the Angirasa Rishis and the Lost Cows.
  60. The article bases itself on the psycho-spiritual interpretation of the Vedas as given by Sri Aurobindo. It examines in particular the famous Vedic legend of the Angirasa Rishis and the lost cows.

  61. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (1998/2005). Self and personality in Sri Aurobindo's yoga: An overview of his terminology.
  62. An overview of the terms Sri Aurobindo uses to explain the different parts and planes of our nature.

  63. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2000). The Integration of Psychological Knowledge from the Spiritual Traditions in the Psychology Curriculum.
  64. A paper published in the journal of the Consciousness and Experiential Psychology section of the British Psychological Society (August 2000).

  65. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Introduction to Consciousness and Its Transformation.
  66. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Consciousness and Its Transformation.
  67. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Introducing Indian Psychology, the Basics.
  68. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Towards an Integral Epistemology of Consciousness: A radical proposal based on Sri Aurobindo's work.
  69. A paper presented at the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore during a conference on Consciousness and Evolution (June 2001).

  70. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2002). Integrality.
  71. An informal talk given at the Cultural Integration Fellowship in San Fransisco, linking the concept of integrality back to the Sanskrit word "purna" (April 2002).

  72. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2002). Sri Aurobindo's Evolutionary Ontology of Consciousness.
  73. In this article a comparison is drawn between Sri Aurobindo's evolutionary conceptualization of consciousness and the concepts of consciousness more commonly encountered in contemporary consciousness studies. A number of ontological and epistemological questions arising out of this comparison are discussed. A slightly modified version was published as a chapter in Helmut Wautischer (ed.). (2008) Ontology of Consciousness: Percipient Action, Boston: The MIT Press.

  74. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2005). Psychology: Five major Indian contributions.
  75. This article discusses the five major contributions which the Indian tradition can make to psychology, and then focusses on six passive and six active aspects of consciousness as conceptualized by Sri Aurobindo.

  76. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2006). Research about yoga and research in yoga: Towards rigorous research in the subjective domain.
  77. This article tries to explain how first-person, yoga-based research can be made rigorous and reliable.

  78. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2007). In Defence of Rigorous Subjectivity.
  79. This article gives the basic argument why rigorous, yoga-based, research of first person experience is necessary to take Psychology further. It is based on a keynote given at the Annual Conference of the Transpersonal Psychology Section of the BPS in 2007.

  80. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2007). Yoga as research method.
  81. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). What is knowledge? A reflection based on the work of Sri Aurobindo.
  82. This article looks from an experiential angle at the different types of knowledge that are involved in yoga-based research. A slightly shorter version has been included in Matthijs Cornelissen, Girishwar Mishra and Suneet Varma (eds.) (2011), Foundations of Indian Psychology (Vol. 1), New-Delhi: Pearson.

  83. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). Onward she passed... Rejection as described in Savitri.
  84. The article takes examples from Savitri, a book by Sri Aurobindo, to explain the concept of "rejection", one of the three main skills needed for any true spiritual endeavour. It traces the crucial role played by rejection in the yoga of Ashwapati and Savitri.

  85. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). Sri Aurobindo, A short biography.
  86. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Beyond the mask: An exploration of human identity based on the work of Sri Aurobindo.
  87. After a quick attempt at placing "Indian Psychology" within the context of mainstream academic psychology, the first half of this article discusses the methods that Indian psychology uses to explore our human sense of identity. The second half offers some of its salient findings, regarding both, our surface nature and our innermost Self.

  88. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Are Schools Injurious to Health?.
  89. Educational theories and policies tend to include noble and inspiring ideals regarding the "all-round development" of the students. The practice lives, however, rarely up to the intent. More often than not, the content of the curriculum and the manner in which it is transacted are such, that a negative effect on the healthy development of the students is almost inevitable. This chapter asks attention for some of these factors, and suggests that much could be gained, if we would be more open to what the Indian tradition can contribute to contemporary psychology.

  90. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Types of knowledge and what they allow us to see: How our research methods affect the quality of our psychological understanding.
  91. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2014). A few slides.
  92. This article is an annotated list of PDF files with Keynote slides on issues like: types of knowledge; methodology & epistemology; consciousness; the structure of the personality; etc.

  93. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs, Misra, Girishwar, & Varma, Suneet (Ed.) (2011). Foundations of Indian Psychology: Practical applications.
  94. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs, Misra, Girishwar, & Varma, Suneet (Eds.) (2011). Foundations of Indian Psychology: Theories and concepts.
  95. Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs, Misra, Girishwar, & Varma, Suneet (Eds.) (2011). Introduction to Foundations of Indian Psychology.
  96. Cortright, Brant (2001). Integral psychotherapy as existential Vedanta.
  97. Cortright, Brant (2002). The Meeting of East and West: The Fusion of Vedanta and Western Psychology in Integral Psychology.
  98. Daftuar, C. N. (2002). Spirit, Mind and Body Connection (a new field for research in psychology).
  99. Daftuar, C. N. (2002). A New Approach to Measure Spiritual Quotient (SQ).
  100. Dalal, A. S. (2001). Reversal of consciousness, thoughts on the psychology of the new birth.
  101. Dalal, A. S. (2004). Sri Aurobindo on Cosmic Consciousness: An Integral View.
  102. The article mainly focuses on the theme of cosmic consciousness as presented by Sri Aurobindo in his writings.

  103. Dalal, Ajit K. (1999). Health beliefs and coping with a chronic illness.
  104. This paper examines the relationship between cultural beliefs about illness and psychological adjustment to a chronic disease. It argues for an integrated health care system combining the strengths of traditional healing and biomedical practices.

  105. Dalal, Ajit K. (2004). Folk Wisdom and Traditional Healing Practices: Some Lessons for Modern Psychotherapies.
  106. Dalal, Ajit K. (2005). Integrating Traditional Services within Primary Health Care.
  107. This paper critically reviews the current status of primary health care services in India. The paper argues that traditional health services which have existed for thousands of years and have wide acceptance and application throughout India need to be rejuvenated and integrated within the existing health care programmes.

  108. Dalal, Ajit K. (2006). Social interventions to moderate discriminatory attitudes: The case of the physically challenged in India.
  109. Disability attitudes are the major barriers in improving life conditions of physically challenged in developing countries. In this article, some social interventions aimed at changing the disability attitudes of rural people in India are discussed.

  110. Dalal, Ajit K. (2006). Psychosocial Interventions for Community Development.
  111. The chapter argues that it is a major challenge for the Government, bureaucrats, activists and social scientists to prepare viable community development programmes. The psycho-social barriers to community participation have been discussed and ways are suggested to facilitate it.

  112. Dalal, Ajit K. (2007). Indigenous belief system and its linkages with mental and physical health.
  113. Dalal, Ajit K. (2010). Folk wisdom and traditional healing practices: Some lessons for modern psychotherapies..
  114. This chapter explores the characteristic features of traditional healing practices and attempts to decipher the ways in which they work. The purpose is to draw parallels between folk practices and modern psychotherapies and identify learning opportunities from ancient wisdom.

  115. Dalal, Ajit K. (2010). A journey back to the roots: Psychology in India.
  116. This chapter traces the history of psychology in India and discusses how it can be enriched by drawing from the classical Indian texts.

  117. Dalal, Ajit K., & Biswas, G. (2009). Self-construal among healthy and chronically sick women.
  118. The nature of self-construal was qualitatively explored among healthy and chronically sick women. The narrative analysis of their life scripts focused on the role of health and life circumstances in shaping their self-construal. It was found that most of these women construed their selves in terms of their role relationships.

  119. Dalal, Ajit K., & Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2010). Sri Aurobindo: A Yogi and a Poet.
  120. The chapter discusses the biography of an eminent Indian yogi and a poet, Sri Aurobindo. It also throws light on his creative genius as evident in his writings, particularly in his classic work, Savitri.

  121. Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2002). Social psychology in India: Evolution and emerging trends.
  122. The chapter deals with growth and expansion of social psychology in India. It illuminates how western social psychology went through the process of indigenization in India.

  123. Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2006). Psychology of health and well-being: Some emerging perspectives.
  124. This paper tries to offer an overview of the salient developments in the area of health psychology by critically examining the concepts and research evidence. The key aspects of Ayurveda and the contemporary health scenario in the Indian context is presented. A comprehensive model of health consisting of three components, i.e., restoration, maintenance and promotion is presented.

  125. Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2010). The core and context of Indian psychology.
  126. This article makes an effort to conceptualize and situate the emerging field of Indian psychology (IP) in the disciplinary matrix. The meaning, scope, critical features and misconceptions about IP have been articulated.

  127. Dalal, Ajit K., & Singh, A. K. (1992). The role of causal and recovery beliefs in the psychological adjustment to a chronic disease.
  128. This paper attempts to study psychological adjustment of hospital patients seeking treatment for tuberculosis using the attributional theoretical approach. They examined patients' perceptions of their disease, its causes and the factors which may be responsible for recovery. The findings highlighted the importance of cultural factors in shaping patients' perception of the causes and recovery. They revealed the extent to which metaphysical concerns shape the construction of illness in India, and also explain why patients seek alternative healing systems.

  129. Dash, A. S. (2004). Methods of Study in Indian Psychology.
  130. This paper discusses the various methods applied by some of the ancient Indian systems to study the human mind.

  131. Dash, A. S., & Rout, Mamata (2002). Indian Concepts of Personality.
  132. This article presents a very brief overview of the various Indian views on personality.

  133. Deo, Jay Mangal (2002). Buddhist Approach to Emotional Management.
  134. Deo, Savita (2002). Addictive Personality and its Counterpart in Indian Psychology.
  135. Deo, Savita (2004). Personality Types: Indian and Western.
  136. Deo, Savita (2007). Buddhism on Human Personality: Psychological Response to Dhukkha.
  137. Deuskar, Megha (2002). Yoga Nidra and Stress Reduction.
  138. Devaki, P. Baby (2004). Emotional Intelligence and Indian Thought.
  139. Dhingra, Niti (2007). Furthering Integration between Eastern Spirituality and Western Psychotherapy.
  140. Dilipkumar, K. V. (2007). Ayurvedic perspective of psychotherapy.
  141. Dokkupalle, Saroja (2004). Effect of behaviour, hypno and spiritual therapies on management of anxiety neurosis.
  142. Dolichan, Kollarath M. (2007). Human Models and Developmental Efforts.
  143. Dubey, S. N. (2004). Yogic Life Style of Indians.
  144. Duggal, Shalini (2007). A Study of Positive Psychological Characteristics: Relationship between Life Satisfaction, Grit, Gratitude, Happiness and Meaning in Life.
  145. Dutia, Asha (2004). Aesthetics of Change: How family therapy works.
  146. Dwivedi, Shweta (2004). Yoga an Important Process in the Education of Human Beings.
  147. Dwivedi, Shweta (2007). Yoga and Yogic Knowledge Past and Present.
  148. Elamurugan, V. S. (2004). Yoga, Liberation and Transformation, Health and Healing.
  149. This paper gives a quick review of the meaning and application of yoga. Yoga, defined here as a science of life liberates, transforms and heals.

  150. Fernandes, Jacksan John (2007). Influence of Personality on Religiosity and Paranormal Experiences.
  151. Gala, Jigisha (2004). Coping With Stress Among Indian Adolescents Belonging to the High Income Group.
  152. This paper is a study on the various ways of coping with stress employed by adolescents. Two major ways found to cope with stress are: problem solving and managing emotions.

  153. Gangopadhyay, Mugdha (2004). Putting People at the Heart of Corporate Strategy: Implication of Indian Psychology.
  154. Ganguli, Devdip (2004). The Adventure of Consciousness: India's spiritual evolution.
  155. Gaur, Aditi (2007). Symbols of Life and Death.
  156. Gaur, B. P. (2004). Effect of Preksha Meditation on Management of Stress in Teenagers.
  157. Gaur, Sunil D. (2004). Why Am I Here? Towards an Indigenous Psychology of Motivation.
  158. Gaur, Sunil D. (2005). Self in contemporary life: Challenges and possibilities.
  159. In contrast to Western psychology which provides an outward-looking view focusing on the problems faced by man and their solutions, Indian psychology views such problems as related to deeper philosophical aspects of the human being and suggests an inward-looking approach to solve them. The quest for self and identity and the nature of self as "witness" provides the platform for psychological enquiry and research at different levels of existence, from biosocial to spiritual.

  160. Gaur, Sunil D. (2007). Rethinking Well Being.
  161. Goswami, Ayushman (2002). Yogata Karmasu Kaushalam.
  162. Goswami, Ayushman (2004). Yoga, Meditation and Education: A way of character building.
  163. This paper deals with the Gita’s perspective on Yoga in relation to improving the quality of education, methods of teaching, and morale of teachers.

  164. Gunusekaran, M. (2002). Improving the Cognitive Functions in the Language Learning Area of Learning Disability Children through Yoga.
  165. Gupta, Monica (2002). Revitalizing Developmental Psychology: Sri Aurobindo's Theory of Human Development.
  166. This chapter attempts to explore Sri Aurobindo's theory of human development and examine its potential to revitalize the field of Developmental Psychology.

  167. Gupta, R. K. (2002). Individualized Familial Self: An Empirically Based Conceptualization of the Evolving Self of Professionally Educated Elite in a Developing Country.
  168. Hargiss, Dennis (2001). Integral phenomenology: A method for the 'new psychology', the study of mysticism and the sacred.
  169. Based on comparative studies in mysticism and history of religion the author explains a new approach in methodology for the “new psychology” called “Integral phenomenology”.

  170. Henry, Jane (2001). Developing creativity.
  171. This paper shows how Western ideas about how creativity develops have changed over time, through a consideration of the role of inspiration, luck, ability, style, mental flexibility, motivation, experience, intuition and context.

  172. Huppes, Neeltje (2004). Psychic Education: A workbook based on the writings of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother (bk).
  173. This book was initially meant as a practical guide for teachers and trainees at Mirambika, the Free Progress unit of the Sri Aurobindo Education Society at New Delhi. Over time it has, however, proven invaluable for many others who are not directly involved in education, but who are serious about their spiritual growth, and who want to implement spirituality in their daily life and work.

  174. Huppes, Neeltje (2005). The evolving soul, a key concept in Sri Aurobindo's work: Its ramifications for further development of human potential and Indian Psychology.
  175. This chapter elucidates some of the deepest and highest horizons of mankind based on Sri Aurobindo's vision. Sri Aurobindo foresaw new possibilities for the human instrument and developed techniques for the further development of human potential. The evolving soul or psychic being has an important role in this new development.

  176. Huppes, Neeltje (2007). All Life is Yoga — Applying Integral Psychology in Personal Life and Work.
  177. Huppes, Neeltje (2008). Workshop teaching psychology: The methodology of an integrated approach.
  178. This article is a practical guide for a workshop that explores a new way to understand and teach psychology. It states the importance for change in the objectives and methods of psychology education.

  179. Huppes, Neeltje (2010). Emerging Concerns and Procedures Related to Education of Values: The Vision of Sri Aurobindo.
  180. This article bases itself on the ideas of Sri Aurobindo. It talks about the developmental model of education based on universal principles such as self-awareness and self-development of the students and the teachers.

  181. Huppes, Neeltje (2011). Integral education: An application of Indian psychology
  182. A short, but comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of Integral Education as practised in Mirambika.

  183. Huppes, Neeltje (2011). Teaching Indian Psychology — Challenges and Prospects: An application-oriented paper.
  184. This paper discusses some of the ways and means related to content and process of teaching Indian Psychology. It also addresses the question regarding how to give consciousness its rightful place when we bring Indian psychology back into the classroom.

  185. Husain, Akbar (2002). Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi's Viewpoint on the Concepts of Normality and Abnormality.
  186. Husain, Akbar, & Yaqub, Kekhashan (2002). Yoga: A Holisitc Approach to Spiritual Health and Well-Being.
  187. Iatsenko, Vladimir (2001). Sanjnana, ajnana, vijnana, prajnana.
  188. Iatsenko, Vladimir (2002). Bhartrihari and the Theory of Sphota.
  189. Iatsenko, Vladimir (2004). Vedantic Approach to Consciousness: Some metaphysical background.
  190. Iatsenko, Vladimir (2008). Vedic Studies: Hymns to Indra, RV 5.29 - 5.34.
  191. Here are posted the various hymns that are studied at the weekly class held at IPI by Vladimir.

  192. Isaac, Beena (2007). Meditation — an absolutized consciousness.
  193. Jagannathan, S. (2007). Cultural Education: It's Role in Integral Development of Engineering Students.
  194. Javed, Aquib (2002). Yogic-Force in the Mind and Body Consciousness.
  195. Jha, Arbind Kumar (2004). Learning Paradigm: Indian Tradition.
  196. Jha, Arbind Kumar (2007). The Individual in Indian Thought System: Implications for Indian Psychology and Education.
  197. Jha, V. N. (2004). Nyaya Vaisesika ways of perceiving the world.
  198. Jha, V. N. (2007). Nyaya-Vaisesika Theory of Mind (manas) and the Conscious (atman).
  199. Joshi, Anuradha (2004). Learning to Live, an overview of Jeevan Vidya.
  200. Kanuri, Ramanakumar (2004). The influence of Consciousness on the Science of Management.
  201. Kanuri, Ramanakumar (2007). The Relationship between the Real and Apparent in the light of Meher Baba.
  202. Kapadia, Mala (2007). Indian Psychology or Greater Psychology and Era of Emotional Intelligence.
  203. Kapur, Preeti (2007). Spirituality is Empirical: Some Insights from the Sikh Tradition.
  204. Kapur, Preeti, & Misra, Girishwar (2003). Image of self in the Sikh community: Continuity of the core and global presence.
  205. This article explores the social, psychological and historical processes through which the Sikh community has categorised and differentiated itself from other communities to form a distinct identity. The self-construal of the Sikh community is constituted by spiritual, heroic and aesthetic images. It has a core of shared religious, social and cultural attributes, and a unique blending of continuity and change has helped the Sikh community to have a global presence.

  206. Kashyap, R. L. (2002). Psychology in the Rig Veda and Yajur Veda Mantras.
  207. Kashyap, R. L. (2004). Psychological Ideas in the Veda and Their Relevance for Moderns.
  208. Khalsa, Sat Bir (2004). Yoga as a Clinical Intervention for Psychological Conditions.
  209. Khan, Abdul Majeed (2004). Family, Migration and Ageing: A new Perspective of Health Psychology.
  210. Khubalkar, Rupashree (2002). Psycho-Physiological Effects of Integral Meditation (yaiap).
  211. Khubalkar, Rupashree (2004). Psycho-Physiological effects of Integral Meditation (ipyc).
  212. Kirmani, Mustafa Nadeem (2002). Rituals as part of Therapeutic Systems in India.
  213. Kishore, K. (2011). Women's identity in psychological theory and the Indian cultural context.
  214. This paper attempts to examine some of the predominant theories within psychological discourse on women's identity that are centred around either the ground plan of the body or around relational models of connectedness, interdependence and ethics of responsibility. The paper calls for an approach that looks at the construction of gender as a product of particular cultural circumstances and gender relations as endlessly adaptable and inventive. It also suggests that any study of women's identity in the Indian cultural context must deconstruct the singular monolithic notion of womanhood and explore the aspects of women's identity as coloured by differences of caste, class, region, generation, etc.

  215. Kothari, Saroj (2002). Yoga and Health.
  216. Krishnan, Lilavathi (2007). Interpersonal Dynamics in Indian Psychology.
  217. Krishnan, Lilavathi, Varma, P., & Pandey, V. (2009). Reward and punishment allocation in the Indian culture.
  218. Two scenario studies examined justice perceptions in Indian samples. It was suggested that subjects thought in terms of merit and need, instead of merit or need. Need and merit were rated as being similar in importance when deciding a fair punishment. Attention was drawn to several aspects of justice perception, especially those related to punishment.

  219. Krishnan, Meenakshi (2011). A Participant's view of the IPI introductory course in Indian psychology.
  220. This article is about the Introductory Course on Indian Psychology oraganized by IPI.

  221. Kulkarni-Bhangaonkar, Rachna (2007). Decoding 'Antim Sanskaar' (Hindu Death Rites): Insights on Cultural Continuity from Hindu, Maharashtrian Families.
  222. Kumar, Aswani (2007). Oneness of God: Psychological Reflections on the Communal Problems in India.
  223. Kumar, Kuldeep (2007). Faith in the Doctrine of Karma: Effect on Psychological Well Being and Life Satisfaction.
  224. Kumar, Navin (2007). Yoga Nidra: A Psychotherapeutic Tool For Stress Management.
  225. Kumar, Prema Nanda (2004). Strengthening the psyche: The Savitri way.
  226. Kumar, Sanjay (2011). Significance of workshop on Indian psychology: A participant's review.
  227. This article is about the Introductory Course on Indian Psychology oraganized by IPI.

  228. Kumaran, Shankar V. (2007). Education: How to Teach Indian Psychology.
  229. Kumari, Krishna (2007). The Application of Indian Philosophy and Yoga to contemporary issues in psychology.
  230. Lakshmi, L. Bhagya (2007). Hatha Yoga and Health (LBL).
  231. Lekshmi, R. (2007). Swami Vivekananda's Vision of Man and His Excellence: A Psychophilosophical Approach.
  232. Lim, Shin Sang (2007). Spiritual Journey in Inter Religious Discourse: Surrendering Self in Bhakti and Christian Mysticism.
  233. Madan, Ranjana (2002). Indian Approaches to Psychology as a Means to Effect Change and Transformation in the Light of the Teachings of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother.
  234. Madan, Ranjana (2004). Managing Self by Detached Involvement.
  235. This paper bases itself on the teachings of The Mother and Sri Aurobindo and discusses a few tools that they have given to lead a peaceful, harmonious life. A few exercises that help doing this are discussed: stepping back into yourself, self-observation, widening the consciousness etc.

  236. Mahendran, P. (2002). Effect of yoga practice — 'The Art of Living' — on the subjective well-being of the general population.
  237. Maitreya, C. V. K. (2004). Management of Spiritual Organisations: An ideal approach using Indian concepts.
  238. Malik, Pravir (2002). The Flowering of Arvind Eye Care System.
  239. Manickam, L. Sam S. (2004). Integrative Change Model in Psychotherapy: Perspectives from Indian Thought.
  240. Manjunath, N. K. (2002). Changes in the Depression System Scores and Self-rated Sleep of Institutionalised Elderly Persons Following Yoga and Ayurvedic Interventions.
  241. Marwaha, Sonali Bhatt (2005). Living with poverty: Are psycho-spiritual dimensions the x-factor in family resilience? A proposed research agenda.
  242. The chapter explores the sense of well-being, feelings of happiness and depression among the rural and urban poor. In the process, the extent and role of religious beliefs and practices in coping with poverty have been investigated.

  243. Marwaha, Sonali Bhatt (2007). Perspectives of Belief Systems on Concept of Self.
  244. Maslow, Jan (2001). Insight dialogue session.
  245. This paper is a theoretical and practical guide to a form of meditation known as “insight dialogue”.

  246. Mathew, V. George (2001). Models of consciousness and its transformation.
  247. This article explores the models of consciousness from the Indian perspective.

  248. Mathew, V. George (2002). Integrative Approach to Psychology.
  249. Mathew, V. George (2004). An Integrative Model of Personality and Personal Growth.
  250. This paper elucidates the role of the psychologist in the Indian tradition and reaffirms that personal growth is indispensible to lead an integrated and happy life.

  251. Mathew, V. George (2007). The Psychology of Spirituality and Yoga.
  252. Mathur, Shalini (2007). Evolution of Recent Management Tools from Ancient Vedic Philosophy.
  253. Mehra, Beloo (2004). Individualised and Collaborative Learning: Towards Integral Studies Curriculum at AUM.
  254. This paper provides a brief account of the work being done with regard to finding ways and approaches to bring Indian contributions to inner sciences into the learning experiences of the students at Antioch University.

  255. Mendiratta, Ankita (2004). Integral Education: Learning through Self.
  256. This paper discusses the principles of Integral education and presents a case study of Integral education put in practice at a laboratory school in Baroda.

  257. Menon, Sangeetha (2001). Beside the intentor and the integrator: Looking at two faces of consciousness.
  258. This article explores the question whether the duality involved in understanding consciousness is true or not.

  259. Menon, Sangeetha (2004). Healing through love, debate and just being: Instances from Indian traditions.
  260. Menon, Sangeetha (2007). Epistemology of Experience: Challenges for consciousness and neuropsychiatric studies.
  261. Minhas, L. S. (2002). An Indian Theory of Music and Its Impact on Human Mind.
  262. Miovic, Michael (2001). Towards a spiritual psychology: Bridging psychodynamic psychotherapy with Integral Yoga.
  263. This paper argues that “the fundamental questions of metaphysics are not trivial, because the answers we select for them determine the framework of metapsychology, and that in turn influences clinical practice”. In other words this paper attempts to show how Eastern and Western psychologies can be integrated using a spiritual metapsychology, and how this would affect the theoretical basis of psychotherapy.

  264. Miovic, Michael (2004). Sri Aurobindo and Transpersonal Psychology.
  265. This article provides an overview of Sri Aurobindo’s psychological thought and system of Integral Yoga Psychology (IYP). Relevant biographical and historical background are introduced, and Sri Aurobindo's influence on the development of transpersonal psychology reviewed. Using Sri Aurobindo’s cosmology of consciousness as a framework for transpersonal experience, IYP’s model of planes of consciousness and parts of the being is explained and illustrated with quotations from Sri Aurobindo’s writings. Emphasis is placed on the psychic being (soul) and overhead planes of consciousness, as these are central to IYP’s psycho-spiritual method of transforming the ego. Finally, implications for transpersonal development and transpersonal therapy are formulated, and some clinical applications given.

  266. Mishra, Gyandeep (2007). A study of effect of Pranic Healing (Prana Therapy) on Blood pressure and alpha EEG.
  267. Mishra, Kalyani (2002). Yoga and Indian Approaches to Psychology as a Means to Effect Change and Transformation (KM).
  268. Mishra, Nidhi (2007). Perception of Old Age among the Elderly.
  269. Mishra, Prafulla K. S. (2004). Aesthetic Experiences (Relish of Rasas) in different frameworks.
  270. Mishra, Preeti (2004). Re-Conceptualizing 'Self': Exploring the possibilities of an East-West synthesis.
  271. The paper argues for a complementarity between the western phenomenal-materialist orientation and the eastern spiritual-transcendental-ontology in evolving a worthwhile psychology of Self.

  272. Mishra, Preeti (2007). Abnormality: Symbolism in the Bhagavad-Gita.
  273. Misra, Girishwar (2002). Emotion in Modern Psychology and Indian Thought.
  274. This paper presents an overview of the developments in the study of emotions in mainstream psychology and to explore some of the Indian contributions of Rasa theory that may enrich this field of human enquiry.

  275. Misra, Girishwar (2004). Understanding Causality In Psychology and Indian Thought: Some Methodological and Applied Implications.
  276. Misra, Nishi (2002). Application of Yoga in the Management of Stress-Related Illnesses.
  277. Misra, Santa (2007). Spirituality and peace.
  278. Mohan, Aruna G. (2004). Self-Awareness of the Teacher Develops a Holistic Approach to Education (J. Krishnamurti's Perspective).
  279. This paper expounds the perspectives of J. Krishnamurti on education, in particular the importance of observing and learning one’s own inner psychological structure.

  280. Mohan, Aruna G. (2007). Thought and Sans Thought in Holistic Living of Learners.
  281. Mohan, Deepa (2005). Spirituality: Its impact on health and well-being.
  282. The chapter discusses the effect of spiritual and religious practices on human health and well-being. It reviews studies in the area of mental and physical health to suggest that health behaviour, and quality of social and family life are contingent on religious beliefs, rites and practices.

  283. Mohan, K. Krishna (2001). Spirituality and well-being: An overview.
  284. This paper shows the close relationship between spirituality and well-being by presenting research based evidence that spirituality or a spiritual way of life has a bearing on well-being. In addition, it shows that ideas or concepts drawn from spirituality can be effectively applied to counselling and psychotherapy.

  285. Mohan, K. Krishna (2004). Spirituality, Mental Health and Psychotherapy.
  286. Mohan, Radha (2004). Hypnotherapy as a Psychotherapeutic Tool to Transformation.
  287. Mohanty, Alok (2007). Need For Self Awareness and Reflection Activities in a School Context.
  288. Mohanty, Bindu (2007). Auroville: Towards a Spiritualized Society based on Integral Yoga.
  289. The paper seeks to present preliminary findings from a qualitative research project – an interpretive inquiry — that explores how spiritual ideals held by individuals inform the social psychology of Auroville, a growing international town of 1,800 people from over forty countries.

  290. Mohrhoff, Ulrich (2001). Beyond the cookie cutter paradigm.
  291. This paper brings together the theories of quantum physics with the Indian concept of consciousness.

  292. Mohrhoff, Ulrich (2004). Psychology All the Way Down.
  293. Mohrhoff, Ulrich (2007). The Transparent Brain.
  294. Mukhopadhyay, Susmita (2004). A Probe On Indian Psycho-Philosophy.
  295. Mulla, R. Z., & Krishnan, R. V. (2008). Karma-yoga, the Indian work ideal, and its relationship with empathy.
  296. The relationship of Karma-Yoga with the dimensions of empathy was explored. The results highlighted the differential impact of dimensions of empathy and Karma-yoga was found to be similar to altruism motivation in the Indian context.

  297. Murali, S. (2004). The Aesthetic Dimensions of Sphota and Dhvani.
  298. Murthy, A. R. V. (2007). Conquest of Mind — The Methods and Means.
  299. Murthy, B. Krishna (2002). Yoga in Promoting Mental Health.
  300. Murthy, Pannaga K. (2002). Study of the concepts ahamkara and ego functions.
  301. Murthy, Pannaga K., & Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2004). The concept of "guna": A critical analysis.
  302. CC

  303. Muthu, A. Madalai (2002). Yoga and Stress Management.
  304. Nachimuthu, P. (2004). Relevance of Rituals.
  305. Nagarathnamma, B. (2002). Effect of Yoga in the Alleviation of Psychosomatic Disorders.
  306. Nalini, B. (2002). Psychosocial Aspects of Classical Dance Forms of India.
  307. Naqvi, Arshi Raza (2002). Siddha System of Medicine: The South Indian Alchemy.
  308. Narayanan, Annalakshmi (2004). Integral Psychotherapeutic Intervention for Disturbances of Mind, Body and Vital among Adolescents.
  309. Narayanan, S. (2001). The probabilistic orientation.
  310. Naveen, K. V. (2002). Yoga and Psychosis: Risks and Therapeutic Potential.
  311. Nene, Damodar V. (2004). Psychology of Hinduism.
  312. Ojha, Sandhya (2002). Yoga: As a Psychological Discipline.
  313. Ojha, Sandhya (2004). Psychotherapy in Ayurveda.
  314. Pahwa, Manasi (2004). Spirituality and Counseling.
  315. This paper expresses the need for counsellors to not only develop skills of empathy but also of understanding and love. It states that, “love brings profound healing, and understanding brings lessening of fear”.

  316. Palsane, M. N. (2002). Role of Yamas and Niyamas in Shaping the Attitudes towards the Environment.
  317. Panda, Minati (2011). Cultural Construction of Creativity: Dualism and Beyond.
  318. Pandey, Alok (2001). Practical aspects of integral psychotherapy.
  319. This articles draws the general outline of the principles and techniques of integral psychotherapy.

  320. Pandey, Alok (2004). Psychotherapy and Indian Thought.
  321. This chapter provides a broad overview of the many ways in which Indian psychological concepts and practices can be used in all aspects of counselling and psychiatric care.

  322. Pandey, Alok (2009). Consciousness based approach: An overview.
  323. The article focuses on a consciousness-based approach towards health and healing. According to the author an illness is essentially an inner disequilibrium and that the healer’s task is primarily to help the patient regain the inner and the outer balance.

  324. Pandey, Ashish (2004). Social Development: Inside-out approach In Indian Ancient Wisdom (Learning for Business Organizations).
  325. Pandey, Ashish (2007). Spirituality in Management: A Synthesis of Contemporary and Traditional Thoughts and Agenda for Research.
  326. Pandey, Ashish (2009). Spiritual Climate of Business Organizations.
  327. A well-developed research paper on the importance of spirituality in management: its role and relevance. As the author states, “ the major thesis of this research is that spirituality of employees is reflected in work climate” and this in turn leads to a positive affect of the employees’ service to the customers.

  328. Pandey, N., & Naidu, R. K. (1992). Anasakti and health: A study of non-attachment.
  329. This paper is a study of the indigenous concept of anasakti (non attachment) and its implications for health. The key features of anasakti are identified as effort orientation, emotional equipoise, and weak concern for external reward. The study empirically explored the relationship of anasakti with stress and strain. Results showed that Anasakti had a negative relationship with distress. Progressive detachment was recommended to reduce stress and lead to better performance.

  330. Pandith, Shilpa Ashok (2007). Quality of Life: A Yogic View Using Qualitative and Quantitative Research.
  331. Panguluri, Lalitha (2007). Stress management through Ashtanga yoga of Patanjali.
  332. Panwar, M. R. (2002). Effects of Yogic Exercises on Mental Functions at High-Altitude Acclimatization.
  333. Paranjpe, Anand C. (2002). Challenges and Opportunities for Indian Psychology in a Rapidly Globalizing Post-modern World.
  334. This article talks about the lingering challenge presented by post-colonial mentality and by the forces of Westernization to the Indian contributions to psychology. Indian psychology needs to be taken seriously in the academic world.

  335. Paranjpe, Anand C. (2004). Challenges of Personality Research in India Today.
  336. Paranjpe, Anand C. (2005). Building tall on solid foundations: Directions for indigenous personality research in India.
  337. The chapter identifies the most fundamental concepts and insights from the Indian tradition in the field of personality and the self. Yoga and Advaita are further considered as ways of personality development and self-realization with a comment on possible types of research concerning traditional Indian forms of counselling.

  338. Parasher, Divya (2007). Indian Psychology: A way to self-discovery.
  339. Patel, Aster (2001). Working in Matter.
  340. Patel, Aster (2002). Psychology in India: A future perspective.
  341. Patel, Aster (2004). The Psychological Perspectives of Our Times: Three Shifts of a Rhythm.
  342. Patel, Chandrakant P. (2002). Tics and Suicidal Proneness Treated with Integral Psychology.
  343. Pirta, R. S. (2002). A Holisitc Model of Sustainable Development: An Indian approach to environmental psychology.
  344. This article presents an outline of a cognitive model of development ingrained in the Indian ethos, that has implications for environmental psychology.

  345. Pradhan, R. C. (2002). Rising upto the Supramental Consciousness: Need for a new psychology.
  346. Prakash, Anand (2002). An Indigenous Perspective on Organizational Behaviour in India.
  347. Prakash, Anand (2004). Discovering the Human Side of Enterprise by Reorganizing Indian Organizations.
  348. Prakash, G. P. (2002). Effect of Yoga on Blood Pressure and Moods of Grassland Scientists of Jhansi.
  349. Prakash, Indira Jai (2004). Saging — Development in Old age.
  350. Prasad, Aravind (2007). The Individual and his/her Development: Child Development, Aging, Ashramas.
  351. Prasad, Shanti V. (2007). The Social Self in Indian Belief Systems.
  352. Priya, Kumar Ravi (2004). On Becoming purush: Excursions in Gandhi's Pursuit of seva.
  353. Priya, Kumar Ravi (2004). Survivors' suffering and healing amidst changing socioeconomic forces in two years of post-earthquake Kachchh.
  354. This study provides an account of the socio-historically rooted healing of earthquake survivors over a period of two years in post-earthquake Kachchh. An ethnographic approach was adopted to incorporate the changing socioeconomic context and its impact on the suffering and healing process.

  355. Priya, Kumar Ravi (2007). Experiencing Our True and Transcendental Self: What Recent Developments in Qualitative Research has to Offer to Researchers and Participants.
  356. Quentic-Sequy, Martine (2004). Vedantic Interpretation of Dreams.
  357. Radhakrishna, Shantha (2007). Using Yoga Therapy (YT) to increase communication, social and cognitive skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders.
  358. Raghuram, N. V. (2007). Ego In Indian Philosophy.
  359. Rai, Pramod Kumar (2004). Unveiling Consciousness: Vedantic theory of personality revisited.
  360. This paper discusses the structure of human personality as found in Vedantic psychology and concentrates in particular on the theory of “panch koshas”.

  361. Rajalakshmi, N. P. (2004). Vanaprastha — An Experiment, A Way of Life.
  362. This paper presents a broad overview on a unique experiment in community living by senior citizens called “Vanaprastha”. It presents a plethora of opportunities for research in the area of old age, living situations for the aged and effects of spiritual practices.

  363. Rajani, K. R. (2007). Yoga: A Perspective of Gita and Sri Aurobindo.
  364. Ram Manohar, P. (2007). Ayurvedic approach to treating disorders of the mind.
  365. Ram, Usha (2002). Personality discussed in Bhagwad Gita.
  366. Ram, Usha (2004). Teacher Traits of Ancient India Are Valid Even Today.
  367. Ramalingam, Panch (2002). Challenging Dimensions of Indian Psychology.
  368. Ramalingam, Panch (2004). Pedagogical Techniques in the Ancient Indian Scriptures.
  369. Ramamurthy, Devaraj (2007). Sarala Mandukasana.
  370. Rana, Suvashisa (2004). Human Development over One and Many Lives.
  371. Ranade, Sraddhalu (2002). Parapsychological Phenomena in the Light of Yogic Science.
  372. Rani, N. Jhansi (2002). Effect of Enhancement of Oxygen Supply through Yogic Procedure on Cognitive Task Performance.
  373. Ranta, Randhir Singh (2007). Management of Stress and Coping Behavior of Police Personnel through Indian Psychological Techniques.
  374. Rao, K. Ramakrishna (2002). The Centrality of Consciousness in Classical Indian Psychology.
  375. Rao, K. Ramakrishna (2004). Indian Psychology: Implications and Applications.
  376. Rao, K. Ramakrishna (2005). Scope and substance of Indian Psychology.
  377. Indian psychology studies consciousness in its multifaceted manifestations and offers a set of practices which can be used in realizing truth and for the transformation of the human condition towards perfection.

  378. Rao, Mrinalini (2002). Karma Yoga as Preventive Therapy.
  379. Rao, Mrinalini (2004). If You Don't Mind, It Does Not Matter: A Vedantic exploration of Mind as the object of the self.
  380. The paper states that the paradigm shift of the mind as the seen and the self as the seer has significant implications for mind management.

  381. Rao, Mrinalini (2007). The Wave yearns to be Water: Cultural practices in the Indian tradition to invoke wholeness.
  382. The article takes a deeper look into Hinduism and the various psychological implications it has on the modern practitioner.

  383. Rao, Usha (2002). Yoga and Indian Approaches to Psychology as a Means to Effect Change and Transformation (UR).
  384. Rastogi, Himanshi (2007). Value Systems During Brahmacharya Ashram.
  385. Ratan, Prashant (2007). Nothingness (shunyata): Essence of all phenomena.
  386. Raturi, Radhika (2007). Grieving traditions in India: A Psychological Outlook.
  387. Raul, Baren Kumar (2007). Learning through Project in Mirambika.
  388. Raveesh, B. N. (2004). Role of Religion in Health.
  389. This paper presents a study undertaken to learn about the religious beliefs of hospitalized inpatients and to assess the importance of utilizing religious beliefs in treatment.

  390. Raveh, Daniel (2007). Transformation of Consciousness in Patanjali's Yogasutra and K.C. Bhattacharyya's thought.
  391. Reddy, Ananda (2001). Vedantic yoga-psychology.
  392. Basing itself on ancient Indian thought this article explores the scope and meaning of Vedantic yoga-psychology.

  393. Reddy, Ananda (2004). The Subliminal Self and Its Relation with the Outer Personality.
  394. Reddy, Kittu (2002). Organisational psychology in the Indian Context.
  395. Remella, Uma (2002). Transformational Leadership.
  396. Renukadevi, S., & Mukhopadhyay, B. (2002). Chakra Meditation in Achieving Altered States of Consciousness.
  397. Robinson, S. (2002). Yoga and Indian Approaches to Psychology.
  398. Roy, Debdulal Dutta (2004). Picture drawing test to assess consciousness layers of tribal children.
  399. Roy, Debdulal Dutta, & Mukhopadhyay, Susmita (2002). Spiritual Health of Organisation: A new vision of organisational change in rural bank development.
  400. This article analyzes the relative importance of organisational spiritual health variables in predicting differences between high and low job satisfied groups. The study was carried out in rural banks.

  401. Roy, Manashi (2007). Foundation of Indian Psychology (essay).
  402. Sachdev, Deepti (2002). Yoga and Indian Approaches to Psychology as a Means to Effect Change and Transformation (DS).
  403. Saha, Proshanto Kr. (2007). The concatenation of four P's in Indian framework of Cognition.
  404. Sahai, Vijendra (2002). Yoga Psychology: An Indian Approach to Psychology.
  405. Sahay, Pragya (2002). Psycho-Philosophical Basis of Yoga.
  406. Sahay, Pragya (2004). Liberation and Transformation through Yoga.
  407. This paper discusses how one can get liberation from desire and transform the lower nature through yoga.

  408. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2001). Contextual approach to meditation and integral psychology.
  409. This article delves deeper into the spiritual dimension of yoga and meditation and explores the real meaning of these terms from the viewpoint of serious practitioners and researchers.

  410. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2002). Psychology of meditation: Theory and practice.
  411. The article gives an overview of (mainly Western) research on and practical advice for the early stages of meditation in the context of modern life.

  412. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2004). Issues and Problems of Assessment in Consciousness Research.
  413. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2008). Indian thought and tradition: A psychohistorical perspective.
  414. The chapter examines the different senses of "Indian psychology". It also discusses the basic concepts and constructs and presents a well-rounded historical introduction. The development of Indian psychology is traced from the Vedic times to the present day, looking for some commonality between disparate thought systems.

  415. Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2010). Indian indigenous concepts and perspectives: Developments and future possibilities.
  416. Salmon, Don (2001). Voyaging through worlds of splendour and calm: An experience of integral psychology.
  417. This article illustrates the principles of Integral psychology with the help of various exercises and practical examples.

  418. Samson, Urmila (2004). Towards a New Education.
  419. This paper outlines the needs of children during different stages as they grow up, which, if fulfilled, will contribute to holistic development.

  420. Samson, Urmila (2007). Continuing towards a New Education.
  421. Satapathy, Sujata (2002). Combined Effect of Art of Living, Counselling and Medical Treatment on Specific Mental Disorders: Some interventional case studies.
  422. Satija, Sarvesh (2002). Srimad Bhagavad Geeta — A Resource Book for Parenting.
  423. Saxena, Manjari (2007). Comparative Study Of Various Breathing Exercises (Pranayama) And Meditation On Cases Of Bronchial Asthma With Mild To Moderate Severity.
  424. Saxena, Tarun Kumar (2007). Effects Of Various Exercises (Yogic / Walking) On Fresh Cases Of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus And Their Relation To Serum Insulin Level.
  425. Sebastian, K. A. (2002). Some Reflections on Meditation and Intimacy.
  426. Sedlmeier, Peter (2004). Western Scientific Methods and Indian Psychology: How far can they go together.
  427. Sedlmeier, Peter (2007). Indian Psychology and the Scientific Method.
  428. A clear exposition of how the existing and well-established methods of mainstream psychology can be applied to Indian Psychology. With some minor changes included in Matthijs Cornelissen, Girishwar Mishra and Suneet Varma (eds.) (2011), Foundations of Indian Psychology (Vol. 1), New-Delhi: Pearson.

  429. Seghal, R. C. (2004). Work-Culture and Its Dimensions.
  430. Sehgal, Surbhi (2004). Disinvestments of a Public Sector Organization: Study from People Perspective.
  431. Seidlitz, Larry (2004). Emotion and its Transformation in Sri Aurobindo's Yoga Psychology.
  432. Sethi, Rashmi (2007). Search for Methodological Options in Education — The Upanishadic Way.
  433. Sharad, Shivantika (2002). Contemporary application and practices of Indian Psychology as taught by Lord Krishna in Geeta.
  434. Sharad, Shivantika (2004). Authenticity and Self: Biographical accounts from a psychological perspective.
  435. Sharan, M. B. (2005). Understanding of human mind and behaviour: The missing link of intuitive experience.
  436. This paper calls for Intuition as a method of psychology and suggests how intuitive mind can be developed for having intuitive experience.

  437. Sharma, Anamika (2004). Handling Conflicts as Yoga by Augmenting Spiritual Intelligence.
  438. Sharma, Anamika, & Jain, Madhu (2002). Yoga as an Intervention Strategy for Augmenting Spiritual Intelligence.
  439. Sharma, Anshuman (2004). Effect of Preksha Meditation on Frustration of Prisoners.
  440. Sharma, Anshuman (2007). Preksha Meditation as a Treatment Modality for Mental Health: A Pilot Study.
  441. Sharma, Chote Narayan (2001). Consciousness and its transformation (CNS).
  442. Sharma, Jyotsna (2007). Indian Philosophy and Human Development.
  443. Sharma, Kavita A. (2011). From Despondency to Action: The Transformation of Arjuna and Yudhishdhira in the Mahabharata.
  444. Sharma, Manju (2004). Implementation of Yoga Programme in Schools: Need of the hour.
  445. Sharma, Neerja (2004). Education of Children with Special Needs: Reflections on Best Practices to Assimilate Children in the Mainstream.
  446. Sharma, Pradeep (2004). The Psychological Mode of Existence of a Work of Art.
  447. Sharma, Pulkit (2004). On The Seashore: Dialogues Between Indian Psychology and Modern Psychotherapy.
  448. According to this paper in order to alleviate suffering, Indian Psychology and modern psychotherapy can complement each other; a theoretical framework is needed that could contain all levels of consciousness, which could create a possibility of a dialogue between diverse perspectives.

  449. Sharma, Pulkit (2006). Science and spirituality: From impasse to innovation.
  450. This paper addresses the split created between 'science and spirituality' within dominant academic discourse which is leading to inner chaos in the minds of modern youth. It has further highlighted the need to have a dialogue between scientists and spiritualists to bridge the split.

  451. Sharma, R. S. (2007). Mano-Yoga Therapy (M.Y.T.): A Clinical Method.
  452. Sharma, Subhash (2005). Quantum States of Mind: Ordinary perception to Extra-Ordinary Perception.
  453. The traditional classification of the four states of consciousness - waking state, dream state, sleep state, and transcendence state (Turiya) - is combined through quantum states of mind - ordinary perception, extra-sensory perception and extra-ordinary perception - to create a 12 state consciousness-perception matrix. The paper elaborates on the concept and nature of the three quantum states of mind, their correspondence to the body, mind and spirit and considers the relation of extra-ordinary perception to cosmic consciousness.

  454. Sharma, Swati (2007). Hatha Yoga and Health (SS).
  455. Shetgovekar, Suhas (2007). Petal Oracle (Prasad Pakhali): A Psychotherapeutic Approach.
  456. Shirazi, Bahman A. K. (2001). Integral psychology, metaphors and processes of personal integration.
  457. Shirazi, Bahman A. K. (2007). Key features of Integral Yoga.
  458. Shraddhavan (2001). Savitri, a key to Sri Aurobindo's "psycho-cosmology".
  459. Shukla, Aradhana (2002). Dimensions of Indian and Western psychology.
  460. Sibia, Anjum (2004). Education for Life: The Mirambika Experience.
  461. Sibia, Anjum (2011). Life and learning at Mirambika: Towards evolving mind.
  462. This article uses the ethnographic method to examine the teaching-learning process in Mirambika, a centre for learning based on Free Progress Education, as outlined by Sri Aurobindo and The Mother.

  463. Singh, Abha (2004). Hatha Yoga, Health and Healing.
  464. Singh, Arun Pratap (2007). Religiosity and Well Being among Urban Adolescents: Implications for Life Style Intervention Programme.
  465. Singh, Avadesh (2004). On the Hegemony of Western Research Methodology: Quest for Alternative Indian Perspectives.
  466. The article explores the Indian theories and perspectives on research methodologies.

  467. Singh, Jitendra (2007). Personality Types in Indian tradition and their Relevance in Contemporary Period.
  468. Singh, Kundan (2001). Beyond postmodernism: Towards a future psychology.
  469. This paper explores the connection between postmodern thought and mysticism with reference to psychology.

  470. Singh, Kundan (2002). Relativism and its Relevance for Psychology.
  471. Singh, Kundan (2004). Moral Relativism and the Practice of Integral Yoga.
  472. Singh, Kundan (2007). Indian Psychology and the Evolution of Integral Consciousness.
  473. Singh, Kundan (2014). Laying the Foundations for Indian psychology.
  474. Singh, Maneesha (2007). Does Spirituality Help in Keeping Oneself Healthy?.
  475. Singh, Pawan Kumar (2004). Indian Ethos and Human Resource Development.
  476. Singh, Purnima (2007). Lessons from History: Conception of Retribution and Revenge in the Indian Mindscape.
  477. Sovatsky, Stuart (2002). Spiritual Depths of Admiration in Family Therapy: Grihasta — Family Life as a Spiritual Path.
  478. Srinithi, S. S. (2007). Studenthood: The Manifestation of 'The Indomitable Spirit'.
  479. Srinivas, K., & Mohan, K. Krishna (2002). The concept of Mind in Orthodox Indian Thought: Its Implications for Modern Psychology.
  480. Srivastava, G. N. Prakash (2004). Indigenous Approaches to Self and Consciousness.
  481. Srivastava, G. N. Prakash (2007). Indigenous Views on Epistemology, Self and Consciousness.
  482. Srivastava, Mukesh (2004). Self and Consciousness.
  483. This paper develops the thesis that consciousness per se is not constructed or shaped by the material process of cognition or perception triggered by the brain, but that in the ultimate sense, the nature of consciousness may appear to be like that of an energy field transcending the boundaries of individual brains and all external objects.

  484. Srivastava, Usha (2002). Indian Concepts of Personality and Higher Levels of Mind.
  485. Srivastava, Usha (2004). Indian Concepts of Self and Personality.
  486. Subhalakshmi, Salam (2007). Feminine Principle in Manipuri Religion and Culture.
  487. Sudha, P. (2002). A Comparative Study of Psychological Distress Among Practitioners and Non-Practitioners of Yoga.
  488. Suneetha, K. (2005). Coping with incarceration: The role of yoga, meditation, and spirituality.
  489. The chapter explores the role of religion in coping with the stresses of incarceration by prison inmates, and in bringing about a sense of well-being and happiness in their dismal existence. The efficacy of yoga, meditation and spiritual counselling have been further explored as life-transforming tools with the potential to bring about attitudinal and behavioural changes that render them less likely to return to the prison later.

  490. Supriya, & Sahai, V. (2007). Advantages of Yoga.
  491. Taneja, Puja (2002). Triguna as Mediating Variable in Stress and Well-being Relationship: A theoretical model.
  492. Telles, Shirley (2002). Yoga and Psychology: A Brief Overview of Research at Swami Vivekanand Yoga Research Foundation.
  493. Tewari, Anil Kumar (2004). Citta: Substance versus flux.
  494. Thingujam, Nutankumar S. (2002). Death Anxiety among People of Peaceful and Disturbed Areas: A comparative study.
  495. Tripathi, A. N. (2007). Pursuit of Human Excellence and the Indian Psycho-Spiritual Insights.
  496. Tripathi, K. M. (2002). An Indian approach of psychotherapy: Sattvavajaya — Concept and application.
  497. This chapter discusses the concept and application of the psychotherapeutic system of Ayurveda known as "sattvavajaya".

  498. Tripathi, K. M. (2004). Pratyahara — as a technique of Mental Health management.
  499. Tripathi, K. M. (2007). Components of Psychotherapy in Yoga Sutra.
  500. Udhayakumar, C. S. (2007). Yoga and Personal Growth.
  501. Uma, & Sahai, V. (2004). Aurobindo's Philosophy as exhibited in his Poetry through Consciousness.
  502. Upadhyaya, Ishita (2007). Meaninglessness: An opportunity for a new beginning.
  503. Vagrecha, Vimla (2002). Yoga for Householders.
  504. Vagrecha, Y. S. (2002). Causes of Violence and Unity of Consciousness.
  505. Vaidya, P. G. (2002). An Information Theoretic Approach to the Issues of Collective Unconscious and Superconscious.
  506. Varma, Suneet (2002). Academic Psychology in India: Past Trends and Future Possibilities.
  507. Varma, Suneet (2004). One Self or Many Selves.
  508. Varma, Suneet (2005). From the self to the Self: An exposition on personality based on the works of Sri Aurobindo.
  509. The focus in this chapter is on the conceptualization of the person from Sri Aurobindo's perspective. The author demonstrates clear links with the larger Indian perspective which the author has been able to personally relate to, and differentiates Sri Aurobindo's perspective from some major schools of mainstream psychology, like Psychoanalysis, Behaviourism, Humanistic psychology and Transpersonal psychology (which comes closest to the Indian perspective).

  510. Varma, Suneet (2007). Self work as a prerequisite for counselors and therapists: An Indian perspective.
  511. Velmans, Max (2001). A map of consciousness studies.
  512. Vijaybharti (2004). Waking Up to Oneself.
  513. Vimala, T. D. (2004). The Indian approach to personality development.
  514. This paper examines the ashrama scheme of life and other traditional practices for the integrated development of personality which equips the individual to face contemporary challenges and lead a fulfilled life.

  515. Viswanathan, S. (2002). Yoga Education in Annamalai University: A role model centre, funded by UGC and approved by NAAC.
  516. Vyas, Bhaskar (2004). Utilization of Archetypal Symbols from Indian Tradition in Hypnotherapy.
  517. Vyas, Dipika Bipinchandra (2004). Spirituality in Loka Sangraha.
  518. Vyas, Rajni (2004). Scientific Foundation of Hypnotherapy.
  519. Wadhwa, Toolika (2007). Beyond the Prison Walls: Reforming through Silence.
  520. The article, based on a study done in Tihar Jail, focuses on how experiential meditation in Vipassana helps the inmates to attain peace of mind, deal with their emotions related to crime and reconstruct their identities. It presents the beliefs, experiences and practices of these inmates.

  521. Wood, Ananda (2002). Old ideas of mind.
  522. Wood, Ananda (2004). Physics and Psychology.