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Yoga is nothing
but practical psychology
(Sri Aurobindo)

 
 
 

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Texts on Indian Psychology
Listed Subject-wise


- There is another page where these texts are sorted by author's name.
- There is a separate page for texts by Sri Aurobindo and the Mother.
- If you would like to publish your paper here, please contact us.

(2001) -- Second International Conference on Integral Psychology, Pondicherry, January 2001
(2002) -- National Conference on Yoga and Indian Approaches to Psychology, Pondicherry, September 2002
(2004) -- National Conference on Indian Psychology, Yoga and Consciousness, Pondicherry, December 2004
(2007) -- National Seminar on Indian Psychology: Theory and Models, Bangalore, December 2007


 

  • All texts
  • Only full texts
  • Only recommended texts

1 Foundations: What is Indian Psychology?

1.1 Indian psychology as a phenomenon within science; its recent history (36)
1.2 Yoga and yogic knowledge in society, past and present (19)
1.3 Articles based on specific literary sources (18)
1.4 Philosophical foundations: the nature of consciousness (39)
1.5 Articles related to Integral Yoga (33)

2 Self, personality and their development: Who am I?

2.1 The structure of the personality; planes and parts of the being; maps (19)
2.2 The centre of identity: ego, soul and Self; realization as phenomenon (19)
2.3 Child development; Life stages; aging (8)
2.4 Human types; gunas; varnas; SQ (10)

3 Pathways to knowledge: How do I know?

3.1 Types of knowledge; the knowledge that makes everything known (15)
3.2 How knowledge is acquired; perception, memory, intuition (5)
3.3 How knowledge can be improved; methodology (17)
3.4 Language (3)

4 The taste of life: How do I enjoy, work, love, adore?

4.1 Emotions and attitudes; rasa, bhava and Ananda (7)
4.2 Desires and motivation; detachment and work (7)
4.3 Relations; love; devotional religion (4)
4.4 Art and aesthetics (11)

5 Yoga: How do I find the Divine and do his work in the world?

5.1 Motivation for change; aspiration; suffering (8)
5.2 Yoga and therapy compared (9)
5.3 Basic processes and methods of yoga (33)
5.4 Development over many lives; reincarnation (1)
5.5 Higher ranges of development; realization and transformation; siddhis (2)

6 Health and healing: How can I help others, and especially those in difficulty?

6.1 Health and well-being (28)
6.2 Psychological aspects of physical illness (8)
6.4 Counselling; therapy (44)
6.5 Statistical & neurological studies of the effects of yoga (25)

7 Education: How can I help others to learn?

7.1 Education in general (11)
7.2 Educational practices (15)
7.3 Teacher education (9)
7.5 Teaching of Indian psychology and yoga (15)

8 Social development: How can I make the society a better place to live and work?

8.1 Social psychology; social development (26)
8.2 Social work; community work (7)
8.3 HRD and organisational psychology (20)
 

1 Foundations: What is Indian Psychology?

1.1 Indian psychology as a phenomenon within science; its recent history (24)
1.2 Yoga and yogic knowledge in society, past and present (7)
1.3 Articles based on specific literary sources (7)
  • Bhawuk, Dharm P. S. (2005). A model of self, work, and spirituality from the Bhagavad-Gita: Implications for self-efficacy, goal setting, and global psychology.
  • This chapter offers an indigenous method to derive a model from the Bhagavad-Gita to show how our physical self is related to social self and work. It highlights how intentional work leads to an entrenched development of social self whereas an indifference towards the fruits of our actions leads us towards our real self. Further, the implications of the model on self-efficacy and goal setting are discussed, together with the possibility of indigenous psychology developing into a global psychology.

  • Choudry, Anuradha (2004). The Legend of the Angirasa Rishis and the Lost Cows.
  • The article bases itself on the psycho-spiritual interpretation of the Vedas as given by Sri Aurobindo. It examines in particular the famous Vedic legend of the Angirasa Rishis and the lost cows.

  • Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2009). Sri Aurobindo, A short biography.
  • Iatsenko, Vladimir (2008). Vedic Studies: Hymns to Indra, RV 5.29 - 5.34.
  • Here are posted the various hymns that are studied at the weekly class held at IPI by Vladimir.

  • Kapur, Preeti, & Misra, Girishwar (2003). Image of self in the Sikh community: Continuity of the core and global presence.
  • This article explores the social, psychological and historical processes through which the Sikh community has categorised and differentiated itself from other communities to form a distinct identity. The self-construal of the Sikh community is constituted by spiritual, heroic and aesthetic images. It has a core of shared religious, social and cultural attributes, and a unique blending of continuity and change has helped the Sikh community to have a global presence.

  • Miovic, Michael (2004). Sri Aurobindo and Transpersonal Psychology.
  • This article provides an overview of Sri Aurobindo’s psychological thought and system of Integral Yoga Psychology (IYP). Relevant biographical and historical background are introduced, and Sri Aurobindo's influence on the development of transpersonal psychology reviewed. Using Sri Aurobindo’s cosmology of consciousness as a framework for transpersonal experience, IYP’s model of planes of consciousness and parts of the being is explained and illustrated with quotations from Sri Aurobindo’s writings. Emphasis is placed on the psychic being (soul) and overhead planes of consciousness, as these are central to IYP’s psycho-spiritual method of transforming the ego. Finally, implications for transpersonal development and transpersonal therapy are formulated, and some clinical applications given.

  • Shraddhavan (2001). Savitri, a key to Sri Aurobindo's "psycho-cosmology".
1.4 Philosophical foundations: the nature of consciousness (16)
1.5 Articles related to Integral Yoga (33)

2 Self, personality and their development: Who am I?

2.1 The structure of the personality; planes and parts of the being; maps (10)
2.2 The centre of identity: ego, soul and Self; realization as phenomenon (6)
  • Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Beyond the mask: An exploration of human identity based on the work of Sri Aurobindo.
  • After a quick attempt at placing "Indian Psychology" within the context of mainstream academic psychology, the first half of this article discusses the methods that Indian psychology uses to explore our human sense of identity. The second half offers some of its salient findings, regarding both, our surface nature and our innermost Self.

  • Gaur, Sunil D. (2005). Self in contemporary life: Challenges and possibilities.
  • In contrast to Western psychology which provides an outward-looking view focusing on the problems faced by man and their solutions, Indian psychology views such problems as related to deeper philosophical aspects of the human being and suggests an inward-looking approach to solve them. The quest for self and identity and the nature of self as "witness" provides the platform for psychological enquiry and research at different levels of existence, from biosocial to spiritual.

  • Kapur, Preeti, & Misra, Girishwar (2003). Image of self in the Sikh community: Continuity of the core and global presence.
  • This article explores the social, psychological and historical processes through which the Sikh community has categorised and differentiated itself from other communities to form a distinct identity. The self-construal of the Sikh community is constituted by spiritual, heroic and aesthetic images. It has a core of shared religious, social and cultural attributes, and a unique blending of continuity and change has helped the Sikh community to have a global presence.

  • Kishore, K. (2011). Women's identity in psychological theory and the Indian cultural context.
  • This paper attempts to examine some of the predominant theories within psychological discourse on women's identity that are centred around either the ground plan of the body or around relational models of connectedness, interdependence and ethics of responsibility. The paper calls for an approach that looks at the construction of gender as a product of particular cultural circumstances and gender relations as endlessly adaptable and inventive. It also suggests that any study of women's identity in the Indian cultural context must deconstruct the singular monolithic notion of womanhood and explore the aspects of women's identity as coloured by differences of caste, class, region, generation, etc.

  • Mathew, V. George (2004). An Integrative Model of Personality and Personal Growth.
  • This paper elucidates the role of the psychologist in the Indian tradition and reaffirms that personal growth is indispensible to lead an integrated and happy life.

  • Srivastava, G. N. Prakash (2004). Indigenous Approaches to Self and Consciousness.
2.3 Child development; Life stages; aging (1)
  • Rajalakshmi, N. P. (2004). Vanaprastha — An Experiment, A Way of Life.
  • This paper presents a broad overview on a unique experiment in community living by senior citizens called “Vanaprastha”. It presents a plethora of opportunities for research in the area of old age, living situations for the aged and effects of spiritual practices.

2.4 Human types; gunas; varnas; SQ

3 Pathways to knowledge: How do I know?

3.1 Types of knowledge; the knowledge that makes everything known (6)
3.2 How knowledge is acquired; perception, memory, intuition (3)
3.3 How knowledge can be improved; methodology (11)
3.4 Language (1)

4 The taste of life: How do I enjoy, work, love, adore?

4.1 Emotions and attitudes; rasa, bhava and Ananda
4.2 Desires and motivation; detachment and work (3)
4.3 Relations; love; devotional religion (1)
4.4 Art and aesthetics (2)
  • Dalal, Ajit K., & Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2010). Sri Aurobindo: A Yogi and a Poet.
  • The chapter discusses the biography of an eminent Indian yogi and a poet, Sri Aurobindo. It also throws light on his creative genius as evident in his writings, particularly in his classic work, Savitri.

  • Henry, Jane (2001). Developing creativity.
  • This paper shows how Western ideas about how creativity develops have changed over time, through a consideration of the role of inspiration, luck, ability, style, mental flexibility, motivation, experience, intuition and context.

5 Yoga: How do I find the Divine and do his work in the world?

5.1 Motivation for change; aspiration; suffering (3)
5.2 Yoga and therapy compared (8)
5.3 Basic processes and methods of yoga (14)
5.4 Development over many lives; reincarnation
5.5 Higher ranges of development; realization and transformation; siddhis (2)

6 Health and healing: How can I help others, and especially those in difficulty?

6.1 Health and well-being (13)
  • Brownstein, Arthur (2004). Mind-Body Interactions in Health and Healing: A Yogic Perspective.
  • This article talks about the amazing healing system of the human body and how yoga can support this healing system to promote a superior state of mental and physical health.

  • Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Consciousness and Its Transformation.
  • Dalal, Ajit K. (1999). Health beliefs and coping with a chronic illness.
  • This paper examines the relationship between cultural beliefs about illness and psychological adjustment to a chronic disease. It argues for an integrated health care system combining the strengths of traditional healing and biomedical practices.

  • Dalal, Ajit K. (2005). Integrating Traditional Services within Primary Health Care.
  • This paper critically reviews the current status of primary health care services in India. The paper argues that traditional health services which have existed for thousands of years and have wide acceptance and application throughout India need to be rejuvenated and integrated within the existing health care programmes.

  • Dalal, Ajit K. (2006). Social interventions to moderate discriminatory attitudes: The case of the physically challenged in India.
  • Disability attitudes are the major barriers in improving life conditions of physically challenged in developing countries. In this article, some social interventions aimed at changing the disability attitudes of rural people in India are discussed.

  • Dalal, Ajit K. (2010). Folk wisdom and traditional healing practices: Some lessons for modern psychotherapies..
  • This chapter explores the characteristic features of traditional healing practices and attempts to decipher the ways in which they work. The purpose is to draw parallels between folk practices and modern psychotherapies and identify learning opportunities from ancient wisdom.

  • Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2006). Psychology of health and well-being: Some emerging perspectives.
  • This paper tries to offer an overview of the salient developments in the area of health psychology by critically examining the concepts and research evidence. The key aspects of Ayurveda and the contemporary health scenario in the Indian context is presented. A comprehensive model of health consisting of three components, i.e., restoration, maintenance and promotion is presented.

  • Elamurugan, V. S. (2004). Yoga, Liberation and Transformation, Health and Healing.
  • This paper gives a quick review of the meaning and application of yoga. Yoga, defined here as a science of life liberates, transforms and heals.

  • Mohan, Deepa (2005). Spirituality: Its impact on health and well-being.
  • The chapter discusses the effect of spiritual and religious practices on human health and well-being. It reviews studies in the area of mental and physical health to suggest that health behaviour, and quality of social and family life are contingent on religious beliefs, rites and practices.

  • Pandey, N., & Naidu, R. K. (1992). Anasakti and health: A study of non-attachment.
  • This paper is a study of the indigenous concept of anasakti (non attachment) and its implications for health. The key features of anasakti are identified as effort orientation, emotional equipoise, and weak concern for external reward. The study empirically explored the relationship of anasakti with stress and strain. Results showed that Anasakti had a negative relationship with distress. Progressive detachment was recommended to reduce stress and lead to better performance.

  • Rao, Mrinalini (2007). The Wave yearns to be Water: Cultural practices in the Indian tradition to invoke wholeness.
  • The article takes a deeper look into Hinduism and the various psychological implications it has on the modern practitioner.

  • Raveesh, B. N. (2004). Role of Religion in Health.
  • This paper presents a study undertaken to learn about the religious beliefs of hospitalized inpatients and to assess the importance of utilizing religious beliefs in treatment.

  • Salagame, Kiran Kumar (2002). Psychology of meditation: Theory and practice.
  • The article gives an overview of (mainly Western) research on and practical advice for the early stages of meditation in the context of modern life.

6.2 Psychological aspects of physical illness (4)
  • Dalal, Ajit K., & Biswas, G. (2009). Self-construal among healthy and chronically sick women.
  • The nature of self-construal was qualitatively explored among healthy and chronically sick women. The narrative analysis of their life scripts focused on the role of health and life circumstances in shaping their self-construal. It was found that most of these women construed their selves in terms of their role relationships.

  • Dalal, Ajit K., & Singh, A. K. (1992). The role of causal and recovery beliefs in the psychological adjustment to a chronic disease.
  • This paper attempts to study psychological adjustment of hospital patients seeking treatment for tuberculosis using the attributional theoretical approach. They examined patients' perceptions of their disease, its causes and the factors which may be responsible for recovery. The findings highlighted the importance of cultural factors in shaping patients' perception of the causes and recovery. They revealed the extent to which metaphysical concerns shape the construction of illness in India, and also explain why patients seek alternative healing systems.

  • Narayanan, Annalakshmi (2004). Integral Psychotherapeutic Intervention for Disturbances of Mind, Body and Vital among Adolescents.
  • Pandey, N., & Naidu, R. K. (1992). Anasakti and health: A study of non-attachment.
  • This paper is a study of the indigenous concept of anasakti (non attachment) and its implications for health. The key features of anasakti are identified as effort orientation, emotional equipoise, and weak concern for external reward. The study empirically explored the relationship of anasakti with stress and strain. Results showed that Anasakti had a negative relationship with distress. Progressive detachment was recommended to reduce stress and lead to better performance.

6.3 Mental illness
6.4 Counselling; therapy (14)
6.5 Statistical & neurological studies of the effects of yoga (1)
  • Mohan, K. Krishna (2001). Spirituality and well-being: An overview.
  • This paper shows the close relationship between spirituality and well-being by presenting research based evidence that spirituality or a spiritual way of life has a bearing on well-being. In addition, it shows that ideas or concepts drawn from spirituality can be effectively applied to counselling and psychotherapy.

7 Education: How can I help others to learn?

7.1 Education in general (7)
7.2 Educational practices (6)
  • Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2011). Are Schools Injurious to Health?.
  • Educational theories and policies tend to include noble and inspiring ideals regarding the "all-round development" of the students. The practice lives, however, rarely up to the intent. More often than not, the content of the curriculum and the manner in which it is transacted are such, that a negative effect on the healthy development of the students is almost inevitable. This chapter asks attention for some of these factors, and suggests that much could be gained, if we would be more open to what the Indian tradition can contribute to contemporary psychology.

  • Huppes, Neeltje (2011). Integral education: An application of Indian psychology
  • A short, but comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of Integral Education as practised in Mirambika.

  • Huppes, Neeltje (2004). Psychic Education: A workbook based on the writings of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother (bk).
  • This book was initially meant as a practical guide for teachers and trainees at Mirambika, the Free Progress unit of the Sri Aurobindo Education Society at New Delhi. Over time it has, however, proven invaluable for many others who are not directly involved in education, but who are serious about their spiritual growth, and who want to implement spirituality in their daily life and work.

  • Krishnan, Meenakshi (2011). A Participant's view of the IPI introductory course in Indian psychology.
  • This article is about the Introductory Course on Indian Psychology oraganized by IPI.

  • Kumar, Sanjay (2011). Significance of workshop on Indian psychology: A participant's review.
  • This article is about the Introductory Course on Indian Psychology oraganized by IPI.

  • Samson, Urmila (2004). Towards a New Education.
  • This paper outlines the needs of children during different stages as they grow up, which, if fulfilled, will contribute to holistic development.

  • Sibia, Anjum (2011). Life and learning at Mirambika: Towards evolving mind.
  • This article uses the ethnographic method to examine the teaching-learning process in Mirambika, a centre for learning based on Free Progress Education, as outlined by Sri Aurobindo and The Mother.

7.3 Teacher education (4)
7.4 Special-education
7.5 Teaching of Indian psychology and yoga (7)

8 Social development: How can I make the society a better place to live and work?

8.1 Social psychology; social development (8)
  • Batra, Poonam (2004). Education for Social Transformation: Recognising the 'Agency' of the Teacher.
  • This paper discusses school reforms in India. It points at establishing a case for recognizing the ‘agency’ of the teacher in the process of education and learning and it examines some of the key elements and pedagogical features of an integrated teacher education programme that is likely to enable deep reform while engaging with some of the more fundamental questions related to knowledge and the aim of education.

  • Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2002). Social psychology in India: Evolution and emerging trends.
  • The chapter deals with growth and expansion of social psychology in India. It illuminates how western social psychology went through the process of indigenization in India.

  • Dalal, Ajit K., & Misra, Girishwar (2006). Psychology of health and well-being: Some emerging perspectives.
  • This paper tries to offer an overview of the salient developments in the area of health psychology by critically examining the concepts and research evidence. The key aspects of Ayurveda and the contemporary health scenario in the Indian context is presented. A comprehensive model of health consisting of three components, i.e., restoration, maintenance and promotion is presented.

  • Kishore, K. (2011). Women's identity in psychological theory and the Indian cultural context.
  • This paper attempts to examine some of the predominant theories within psychological discourse on women's identity that are centred around either the ground plan of the body or around relational models of connectedness, interdependence and ethics of responsibility. The paper calls for an approach that looks at the construction of gender as a product of particular cultural circumstances and gender relations as endlessly adaptable and inventive. It also suggests that any study of women's identity in the Indian cultural context must deconstruct the singular monolithic notion of womanhood and explore the aspects of women's identity as coloured by differences of caste, class, region, generation, etc.

  • Krishnan, Lilavathi, Varma, P., & Pandey, V. (2009). Reward and punishment allocation in the Indian culture.
  • Two scenario studies examined justice perceptions in Indian samples. It was suggested that subjects thought in terms of merit and need, instead of merit or need. Need and merit were rated as being similar in importance when deciding a fair punishment. Attention was drawn to several aspects of justice perception, especially those related to punishment.

  • Marwaha, Sonali Bhatt (2005). Living with poverty: Are psycho-spiritual dimensions the x-factor in family resilience? A proposed research agenda.
  • The chapter explores the sense of well-being, feelings of happiness and depression among the rural and urban poor. In the process, the extent and role of religious beliefs and practices in coping with poverty have been investigated.

  • Rajalakshmi, N. P. (2004). Vanaprastha — An Experiment, A Way of Life.
  • This paper presents a broad overview on a unique experiment in community living by senior citizens called “Vanaprastha”. It presents a plethora of opportunities for research in the area of old age, living situations for the aged and effects of spiritual practices.

  • Samson, Urmila (2004). Towards a New Education.
  • This paper outlines the needs of children during different stages as they grow up, which, if fulfilled, will contribute to holistic development.

8.2 Social work; community work (4)
  • Dalal, Ajit K. (2006). Psychosocial Interventions for Community Development.
  • The chapter argues that it is a major challenge for the Government, bureaucrats, activists and social scientists to prepare viable community development programmes. The psycho-social barriers to community participation have been discussed and ways are suggested to facilitate it.

  • Mohanty, Bindu (2007). Auroville: Towards a Spiritualized Society based on Integral Yoga.
  • The paper seeks to present preliminary findings from a qualitative research project – an interpretive inquiry — that explores how spiritual ideals held by individuals inform the social psychology of Auroville, a growing international town of 1,800 people from over forty countries.

  • Suneetha, K. (2005). Coping with incarceration: The role of yoga, meditation, and spirituality.
  • The chapter explores the role of religion in coping with the stresses of incarceration by prison inmates, and in bringing about a sense of well-being and happiness in their dismal existence. The efficacy of yoga, meditation and spiritual counselling have been further explored as life-transforming tools with the potential to bring about attitudinal and behavioural changes that render them less likely to return to the prison later.

  • Wadhwa, Toolika (2007). Beyond the Prison Walls: Reforming through Silence.
  • The article, based on a study done in Tihar Jail, focuses on how experiential meditation in Vipassana helps the inmates to attain peace of mind, deal with their emotions related to crime and reconstruct their identities. It presents the beliefs, experiences and practices of these inmates.

8.3 HRD and organisational psychology (4)
  • Cornelissen, R. M. Matthijs (2001). Consciousness and Its Transformation.
  • Henry, Jane (2001). Developing creativity.
  • This paper shows how Western ideas about how creativity develops have changed over time, through a consideration of the role of inspiration, luck, ability, style, mental flexibility, motivation, experience, intuition and context.

  • Malik, Pravir (2002). The Flowering of Arvind Eye Care System.
  • Pandey, Ashish (2009). Spiritual Climate of Business Organizations.
  • A well-developed research paper on the importance of spirituality in management: its role and relevance. As the author states, “ the major thesis of this research is that spirituality of employees is reflected in work climate” and this in turn leads to a positive affect of the employees’ service to the customers.